Headlines Today recreates flooding of the Mandakini river : India: Headlines Today


Headlines Today recreates flooding of the Mandakini river : India: Headlines Today

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.)(Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995)A society for promotion of traditional values through, Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service.REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIAEmail: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793all donations/contributions may be sent toRanjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Horror in Uttarakhand


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Uttarakhand catastrophe: The horror, and the new gods

 
 

A survivor shows her gratitude to the men in uniform in Uttarakhand

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Each yatri had to tell more than his and her story. Heaven it was once which has turned into a burial ground for the living. With all the advancements in technology, all that glib talk of disaster management, the towering Indian conquering the world with his brilliance and high-end acumen, the fact is we failed our people in crisis. Ultimately the armed forces had to be deployed, who emerged as the new gods. Tarun Vijay returns from Gauri Kund with this grim account
The chopper crash killing 20 rescuers on board has once again brought the horror of the situation prevailing in the Kedarnath region. Everyone saluted the brave-hearts who laid down their lives in the service of common Indians. They have emerged as the new gods of Kedarnath. The eye of Shiva that protects, not destroys.
Everything that shouldn’t have happened, happened in Uttarakhand.
The monsoon was forecast a fortnight later, yet with the cloudburst the Chauri Bari lake (also known as Gandhi Sarovar) sank into KedarValley burying thousands under the huge boulders and a wall of water that fell on pilgrims from above. That was on June 16.
The first help reached them on the evening of June 19.
The rush of pilgrims should have been a little less in the week closer to the rains, yet it was overwhelmingly crowded and the road to Kedarnath was like a sea of people of all colours, countries, provinces and castes.
As everyone knows, the monsoon often wreaks havoc in this part of the state, so the disaster management team should have been very, very alert, its plans in place and the manpower smartly distributed at all the vulnerable points so that in any eventuality the rescue teams are rushed to the spot without wasting a second.
None of the areas that are vulnerable and known as the most crowded places in peak season, had any disaster relief team stationed and well-equipped, no emergency plans were ever prepared; no disaster control room was even designed to serve professionally in the last one decade.
The district magistrate of the area should have been the first to sound the alert, and to caution pilgrims when the first news of the rains arrived.
But he suddenly had a massive stroke at the most critical moment and was brought to Dehradun for treatment.
In the shadow of a terrific calamity, the state government took five days to appoint a new DM. The most precious time to control and minimise the damage was thus lost.
The incident also proved that in spite of being the place of highest reverence for Hindus, that brings more than 400 million faithful from across the globe every year, the area didn’t have a hospital to provide emergency treatment to people in distress. Even a district magistrate had to be rushed to Dehradun.
Think of the common citizens and pilgrims in such a situation.
The nation, ie, the political masters who take decisions to send help in such situations, and the media, that creates the atmosphere to have an appropriate response by society, should have been completely focused on the incident.
But when the dying people needed urgent response in Kedarnath, politicians and the television channels were busy responding to Nitish-Modi-Advani-RSS issues and discussing the future of NDA post the JD-U ‘s secular divorce.
Nothing mattered to them as important and as engaging as this political potpourri.
TV Channels relied on their junior-most reporters, sometimes stringers based in the state, they even used Facebook photos as exclusive ‘breaking news’ clips. But a Pakistan election gets their chief editors, principal political editors and the highest-ranking senior analysts to go to Islamabad and report from there.
Plus, the reports from the state were too noisy and haphazardly presented. For Delhi station directors, Kedarnath didn’t deserve a well-planned and top-slotted reporting till the third day was over.
In market-driven stupid shows, the media in Delhi was discussing ‘didn’t I tell you a hundred years before that unless you follow what I have been prescribing such calamities will occur’ and giving a push to ‘green journalism’ in a sordid drama of one-upmanship. And another began a discussion on Rahul-Modi contributions to help Kedarnath victims. They were shameless enough to use a tragedy to earn more masala-driven TRPs.
The TV channels hardly showed any sensitivity to the victims, their relatives and the local residents of Gupt-Kashi, Ukhimath, where almost every home lost a member. Weeping mothers, old men with hardly any energy to speak, wailing families and extreme shows dominated the screen. The print media, on the contrary, was more sincere and sensitive to the situation.

Image: A survivor shows her gratitude to the men in uniform in Uttarakhand
 
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand2.jpg
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It all resulted in chaos.
Chaos that prolonged the dark night of death.
Chaos that saw the most excruciatingly painful and torturous five days for the thousands of pilgrims.
And that perhaps increased the toll of the dead to an unimaginable count.
And look at how our people, our citizens and our kith and kin died.
Usha Soni’s husband died in her lap; he had dysentery and no anti-diarrhea medicine was available.
Sohan Lal Vyas from Udaipur saw her son, daughter-in-law, sister’s son and sister getting buried in the water-wall that came with a huge gush of mud and pebbles.
A mother was holding her little baby at Kedarnath, and to make secure that hold she tried to clutch the Nandi idol, but in that fraction of a second the water flow took away the wailing child.
Khushboo Sahay of Varanasi was swept away with her husband and son; she was found two days later on the river bank, unconscious, by army men and revived.
The people on the 14-km long trek to Kedarnath, a huge sea of faithful, vanished into the watery assault that came with unimaginable force and speed, sweeping away vehicles as if they were made of cardboard.
Those who were fortunate to be alive experienced Pralay — the end of Earth.
A family of eight was washed away with a 10-year-old boy being the lone survivor.
For six days people at Gauri Chatti, Bhairav Ghati, Rambari, Gauri Kund were left to their own devices. No food, no water. All around dead bodies lay scattered. Bodies of dead ponies and scores of other animals turned the area into the most horrendous and frightening one. No one could even airdrop pamphlets with instructions, guidance and hope. No one conveyed to them, ‘We are coming. We shall bring all of you back home safely’.
Porters and pony-wallahs assaulted the women. Pilgrims were taken to wrong, lonely routes to deprive them of their belongings. A porter took 16,000 rupees from a group of 10 from Patna, one of them Narendra Singh, a former chief manager of the State Bank of India, just to show them the correct path to Sonprayag. Fingers of dead bodies were cut to take out golden rings. Their pockets were emptied. An ochre-robed man was found with 80 lakh rupees and promptly arrested.
The aircraft pressed into service to evacuate pilgrims were small, like three- to six-seated choppers. They had a refuelling problem. The director general of police, Uttarakhand, told me and urged for help. I spoke to the prime minister to facilitate the ATF airlifted to higher regions to save time and evacuate more people.
It goes to the credit of our PM that he immediately conveyed this to the cabinet secretary and the needful was done.
Thousands were stranded in Badrinath, Gangotri and Kedarnath regions. It was only after the death toll rose too high and the national media finally understood the seriousness of the catastrophe, that more choppers were brought in to make more sorties.
June 22 and 23 were hectic for Kedarnath, but thousands of stranded pilgrims at Badrinath were told to wait, as ‘they were safe’. We left Gupt Kashi by road on the 24th morning early, at 4.30 am. Hundreds of rescued pilgrims were with us, in vehicles. Old and young women who have lost sons, daughters, fathers and parents and all family members. The tragic stories were endless. Hardly 45 km later we faced huge landslides.
In the entire 200 km stretch only one JCB road clearance machine was deployed. It was working at its peak speed, but still would have taken a day to clear the huge blockades if an army officer, Col Anil Mehra, had not put into action two other JCBs lying idle in a village as they were ‘privately owned’. That’s the difference between a babu-government and the army man, everyone realised.
A young kid, Shivam Bisht, was crying with pain. He had suffered major knee injury at Kedarnath and a bleeding sore in the stomach. By chance a doctor, which had come to Gupt Kashi from AIIMS to help pilgrims, was with our convoy. He did some first aid. Spoke to state’s health minister Surendra Singh Negi, and he assured that once the boy reaches Dehradun he will be provided all medical help and also special financial assistance.

Image: An Indian Air Force helicopter rescues stranded pilgrims in Uttarakhand
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand3.jpg
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The agony that began in Kedarnath was unending.
Have they brought all yatris from Kedarnath? Perhaps not. Some pilgrims were still reported to be in Bhairav Ghati and beyond. With the monsoon beginning, they would be needing immediate help. They might not be having any food, shelter and warm clothes. Who is going to provide all that?
And what about the dead still buried in Kedarnath area? The bodies have begun to decay and stink. Army officers say unless they are cleared in the next two to three days, a massive attack of infections may engulf the entire state.
It’s only on the fourth and the fifth day that some NDRF teams were sent to Guptkashi, Kedarghati, Gauri Kund and Gangotri areas. Doctors’ teams from the Indian Medical Association, AIIMS, Gangaram (New Delhi) too arrived at some places like Guptkashi. But the ordeal of the pilgrims at Gauri Kund, Ram Bari, and Jungle Chatti remained unspeakably painful. No shelter, no tents, out in the open without even a sheet of cloth to cover in that wintry, windy climate. The shopkeepers, lodge-owners, were either dead or gone to safety.
Everywhere it was a spine-chilling reign of fear, bad memories and hopelessness. People were defecating anywhere. Water was down there in the Mandakini river. No one was in a condition to hold the hands of the other. A chopper came but the minister took his two relatives and flew away. More sorties and more chaos. Thousands of stranded people, and a clamour to board and leave the hell. The ‘me-first’ push of the crowd eager to reach a safer zone can’t be described, it can only be felt.
The only gods of succour and life-providing bliss were the men in olive green, the army, the ITBP personnel and the RSS swayamsevaks. Like angels they did everything that was possible in that situation. RSS youngsters were the first to reach Gauri Kund and provide food, water and solace to dejected, fatigued, yatris enveloped in hopelessness. And so were the Gayatri Parivar, local NGOs, the police association, college student unions, etc. It’s a tragedy that driven by hate and an ideological apartheid, the wonderful and selfless contribution of the RSS was completely ignored by the media, though the army men gave them a hug and cooperated with them.
The IAF and army saved thousands of people. Crossing ferocious streams and rivers on a string of wire with old, young and the children clinging to them; like monkey cubs, they dawned on the scene as angels. But too many were to be rescued and too less was the number in proportion to the need and calamity-struck people.
The security personnel manning the air-rescue had to have some rule — and one was to get the women, aged and ailing onboard first. It divided the families. Men and many times young women of the family were left behind. Seemingly young were asked to trek down up to Sonprayag from Gauri Kund, about 14 to 16 km, passing through a bit of forest and negotiating a high hill. In Gangnani area, seemingly youthful ones had to trek approximately 75 km to reach safety.
Though some said it was forgotten that after a painful stretch of five days, without food, even the young were half-dead. The mental stress, deadly dance of agony, and dark fears of life coming slowly to a painful end sap away all the energy that you once had.
But they had no other alternative. The forces that were there to provide safety were left with no other option.
Still some were lucky to be airlifted and some had to walk down to Gupt Kashi. They were a picture of lifeless, darkened and blank-eyed moving bodies.
They needed a shoulder and a few words of consolation.
They needed a blanket of hope and warmth, the hug of a relation. A relationship of being a fellow Indian.

Image: A frail woman being helped to safety In Uttarakhand
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand4.jpg
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The people of Gupt Kashi did try to help them wonderfully. The city, a small buzzing town of pundits, ritual performers, shopkeepers of religious needs like dhoop, agarbattis, pooja samagri, lodge-owners of Kedarnath, helpers, guides, members of temple committee, employees of local government offices was enveloped in grief.
Almost every home in this region, particularly Gupt Kashi and Ukhimath, has lost someone in the family.
They were desperately scouring the lists getting updated every few hours to find if their relatives’ names were there. The town was closed down. No one had the courage to do business when the lights in their homes had died.
Still they were the young and the old of Gupt Kashi, who came out to help forlorn pilgrims. They began a free langar, started missing persons search centre, 24-hour announcements were made of the list of arrived pilgrims and missing names. Medicines were provided free. The RSS volunteers were as usual doing their bit. Providing food, blankets, shelter and guidance. They were the first to reach Gauri Kund, the point where the rescued pilgrims were brought from Jungle Chatti. Hungry, dejected, shocked with grief, fatigued and bewildered at being still alive after having spent six days amidst decaying corpses.
Everything was needed more and everything available was just not sufficient. The town never had the attention of governors sitting at the Dehradun secretariat. In spite of being the centre of gravity for all things happening at Kedarnath, the feeder city to pilgrimage for all purposes, it abysmally lacked in infrastructure. A very unreliable power supply, no solar alternative, no toilets, no city cleaning mechanism, and not even an iota of a disaster management centre.
The government camps for rescued pilgrims had no power supply. When I visited in the evening, candles were being provided to some. Imagine a people just arrived rescued from the jaws of death, and many of them had seen their father, mother, brother, sister, wife, husband dying before their eyes and they had to leave their dead bodies either unattended or had them immersed in the Mandakini without being able to even perform the last rites.
These were the people stationed in the clumsy, dark, and stable-like rooms without a proper toilet facility. A few toilets, in the school, were rendered useless due to paucity of water and non-functional flush. Fatigued and barely able to walk, pilgrims had to ease themselves in the open, on the outskirts of the camp, which was an Inter college building.
And the worst was not yet over. They couldn’t speak to their relatives on phone — mobile phones were not working. BSNL was the only source of some hope, to bring cheer on the faces of their anxious relatives back home, but without power most couldn’t recharge their mobiles. Almost ninety nine percent had got their mobile phones soaked in rain water and besides, the other private mobile phone operators were simply mercilessly insensitive to the tragedy. ‘Happy to help’ meant a hoax call for all of us. They could have had a special arrangement to get the ‘tower’ activated, facilitating communications to the pilgrims. But no one came forward to help them in the hour they needed it most. The first thing, after having survived the unspeakable ordeal, a pilgrim would have liked to do is to speak to his near and dear ones. But we Indians, the companies we own — Vodafone, Tata, Reliance – simply didn’t care.
Nilesh Bharane, the effervescent superintendent of police manning the Gupt Kashi helipad did try the satellite phone to get the Sonis of Gujarat to speak their Mumbai kin but ultimately had to go to a corner of the airfield where like voodoo magic, the signal, feeble though, came through and we saw the Sonis speaking to their folk through intermittent sobs. They had lost their father at Kedarnath.

Image: A large number of pilgrims are still to be evacuated from the heights in Uttarakhand

http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand5.jpg

Each yatri had to tell more than his and her story. Heaven it was once which has turned into a burial ground for the living. With all the advancements in technology, all that glib talk of disaster management, the towering Indian conquering the world with his brilliance and high-end acumen, the fact is we failed our people in crisis. Ultimately the armed forces had to be deployed, who emerged as the new gods.
With the instruments available, within the framework of the existing infrastructure and trained, untrained, manpower at hand, everyone did his best. If the RSS and BJP were there in the forefront of relief work, the Congress and many other organisations too worked at the ground level and I went to them, shook hands and appreciated their efforts unhesitatingly. They are Indians, and should we get into the murky blame game and one-upmanship because we do not belong to their ideology? That would be demeaning to our own noble intentions.
We must salute the spirit of service in everyone who went there and did his bit — if the army, IAF are everyone’s heroes, the police, local employees, district magistrates and officers drawn from various departments tried to help. If the Gauri Kund hospital saw everybody gone to safety, there was one pathologist who refused to leave and nursed single-handedly the rescued yatris coming from Jungle Chatti area.
There are hundreds of such small stories of heroes who made a big difference. The IAF couple who flew sorties to bring back yatris, the Jha-Janamejay duo (DM and SP) in Tehri who got the crucial Mayala road opened to Gupt Kashi, which effectively became a lifeline to rescue work and outflow of yatris.
In times of any huge crisis, people naturally panic and need immediate help. It’s not possible sometimes. Still, I sincerely feel, with no offence to the heroes and every one of those who worked to help, we were lacking in an infrastructure that could have responded to such a situation rapidly. At the end of the day, everything depended on the army and IAF. It was the same in 1940, in 1960, in 1970 and so on.
There are lessons to be learnt. How not to politicise a relief operation, keep the communication channels on in the gravest of situations, have the disaster management team professionally stationed at every vulnerable place, regulate the inflow ofyatris like Kailash and Amarnath Yatras, provide the best of infrastructure to these border areas visited by millions, train the civil servants to be polite and responsive to the common people, and a political leadership that loves to work and mingle with the masses.
Tarun Vijay is member of Parliament, Rajya Sabha; member, Parliamentary Consultative Committee on the Ministry of External Affairs; member, Parliamentary Standing Committee on the Ministry of Human Resource Development; member, Parliamentary Group on India China Friendship; Hon Director, Dr Syama Prasad Mookerjee Research Foundation.

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Uttarakhand the horror and Saviors


 
 
 
 

Uttarakhand catastrophe: The horror, and the new gods

       
 
 
 

A survivor shows her gratitude to the men in uniform in Uttarakhand

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Each yatri had to tell more than his and her story. Heaven it was once which has turned into a burial ground for the living. With all the advancements in technology, all that glib talk of disaster management, the towering Indian conquering the world with his brilliance and high-end acumen, the fact is we failed our people in crisis. Ultimately the armed forces had to be deployed, who emerged as the new gods. Tarun Vijay returns from Gauri Kund with this grim account
The chopper crash killing 20 rescuers on board has once again brought the horror of the situation prevailing in the Kedarnath region. Everyone saluted the brave-hearts who laid down their lives in the service of common Indians. They have emerged as the new gods of Kedarnath. The eye of Shiva that protects, not destroys.
Everything that shouldn’t have happened, happened in Uttarakhand.
The monsoon was forecast a fortnight later, yet with the cloudburst the Chauri Bari lake (also known as Gandhi Sarovar) sank into KedarValley burying thousands under the huge boulders and a wall of water that fell on pilgrims from above. That was on June 16.
The first help reached them on the evening of June 19.
The rush of pilgrims should have been a little less in the week closer to the rains, yet it was overwhelmingly crowded and the road to Kedarnath was like a sea of people of all colours, countries, provinces and castes.
As everyone knows, the monsoon often wreaks havoc in this part of the state, so the disaster management team should have been very, very alert, its plans in place and the manpower smartly distributed at all the vulnerable points so that in any eventuality the rescue teams are rushed to the spot without wasting a second.
None of the areas that are vulnerable and known as the most crowded places in peak season, had any disaster relief team stationed and well-equipped, no emergency plans were ever prepared; no disaster control room was even designed to serve professionally in the last one decade.
The district magistrate of the area should have been the first to sound the alert, and to caution pilgrims when the first news of the rains arrived.
But he suddenly had a massive stroke at the most critical moment and was brought to Dehradun for treatment.
In the shadow of a terrific calamity, the state government took five days to appoint a new DM. The most precious time to control and minimise the damage was thus lost.
The incident also proved that in spite of being the place of highest reverence for Hindus, that brings more than 400 million faithful from across the globe every year, the area didn’t have a hospital to provide emergency treatment to people in distress. Even a district magistrate had to be rushed to Dehradun.
Think of the common citizens and pilgrims in such a situation.
The nation, ie, the political masters who take decisions to send help in such situations, and the media, that creates the atmosphere to have an appropriate response by society, should have been completely focused on the incident.
But when the dying people needed urgent response in Kedarnath, politicians and the television channels were busy responding to Nitish-Modi-Advani-RSS issues and discussing the future of NDA post the JD-U ‘s secular divorce.
Nothing mattered to them as important and as engaging as this political potpourri.
TV Channels relied on their junior-most reporters, sometimes stringers based in the state, they even used Facebook photos as exclusive ‘breaking news’ clips. But a Pakistan election gets their chief editors, principal political editors and the highest-ranking senior analysts to go to Islamabad and report from there.
Plus, the reports from the state were too noisy and haphazardly presented. For Delhi station directors, Kedarnath didn’t deserve a well-planned and top-slotted reporting till the third day was over.
In market-driven stupid shows, the media in Delhi was discussing ‘didn’t I tell you a hundred years before that unless you follow what I have been prescribing such calamities will occur’ and giving a push to ‘green journalism’ in a sordid drama of one-upmanship. And another began a discussion on Rahul-Modi contributions to help Kedarnath victims. They were shameless enough to use a tragedy to earn more masala-driven TRPs.
The TV channels hardly showed any sensitivity to the victims, their relatives and the local residents of Gupt-Kashi, Ukhimath, where almost every home lost a member. Weeping mothers, old men with hardly any energy to speak, wailing families and extreme shows dominated the screen. The print media, on the contrary, was more sincere and sensitive to the situation.

Image: A survivor shows her gratitude to the men in uniform in Uttarakhand
 
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand2.jpg
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It all resulted in chaos.
Chaos that prolonged the dark night of death.
Chaos that saw the most excruciatingly painful and torturous five days for the thousands of pilgrims.
And that perhaps increased the toll of the dead to an unimaginable count.
And look at how our people, our citizens and our kith and kin died.
Usha Soni’s husband died in her lap; he had dysentery and no anti-diarrhea medicine was available.
Sohan Lal Vyas from Udaipur saw her son, daughter-in-law, sister’s son and sister getting buried in the water-wall that came with a huge gush of mud and pebbles.
A mother was holding her little baby at Kedarnath, and to make secure that hold she tried to clutch the Nandi idol, but in that fraction of a second the water flow took away the wailing child.
Khushboo Sahay of Varanasi was swept away with her husband and son; she was found two days later on the river bank, unconscious, by army men and revived.
The people on the 14-km long trek to Kedarnath, a huge sea of faithful, vanished into the watery assault that came with unimaginable force and speed, sweeping away vehicles as if they were made of cardboard.
Those who were fortunate to be alive experienced Pralay — the end of Earth.
A family of eight was washed away with a 10-year-old boy being the lone survivor.
For six days people at Gauri Chatti, Bhairav Ghati, Rambari, Gauri Kund were left to their own devices. No food, no water. All around dead bodies lay scattered. Bodies of dead ponies and scores of other animals turned the area into the most horrendous and frightening one. No one could even airdrop pamphlets with instructions, guidance and hope. No one conveyed to them, ‘We are coming. We shall bring all of you back home safely’.
Porters and pony-wallahs assaulted the women. Pilgrims were taken to wrong, lonely routes to deprive them of their belongings. A porter took 16,000 rupees from a group of 10 from Patna, one of them Narendra Singh, a former chief manager of the State Bank of India, just to show them the correct path to Sonprayag. Fingers of dead bodies were cut to take out golden rings. Their pockets were emptied. An ochre-robed man was found with 80 lakh rupees and promptly arrested.
The aircraft pressed into service to evacuate pilgrims were small, like three- to six-seated choppers. They had a refuelling problem. The director general of police, Uttarakhand, told me and urged for help. I spoke to the prime minister to facilitate the ATF airlifted to higher regions to save time and evacuate more people.
It goes to the credit of our PM that he immediately conveyed this to the cabinet secretary and the needful was done.
Thousands were stranded in Badrinath, Gangotri and Kedarnath regions. It was only after the death toll rose too high and the national media finally understood the seriousness of the catastrophe, that more choppers were brought in to make more sorties.
June 22 and 23 were hectic for Kedarnath, but thousands of stranded pilgrims at Badrinath were told to wait, as ‘they were safe’. We left Gupt Kashi by road on the 24th morning early, at 4.30 am. Hundreds of rescued pilgrims were with us, in vehicles. Old and young women who have lost sons, daughters, fathers and parents and all family members. The tragic stories were endless. Hardly 45 km later we faced huge landslides.
In the entire 200 km stretch only one JCB road clearance machine was deployed. It was working at its peak speed, but still would have taken a day to clear the huge blockades if an army officer, Col Anil Mehra, had not put into action two other JCBs lying idle in a village as they were ‘privately owned’. That’s the difference between a babu-government and the army man, everyone realised.
A young kid, Shivam Bisht, was crying with pain. He had suffered major knee injury at Kedarnath and a bleeding sore in the stomach. By chance a doctor, which had come to Gupt Kashi from AIIMS to help pilgrims, was with our convoy. He did some first aid. Spoke to state’s health minister Surendra Singh Negi, and he assured that once the boy reaches Dehradun he will be provided all medical help and also special financial assistance.
Image: An Indian Air Force helicopter rescues stranded pilgrims in Uttarakhand
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand3.jpg
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The agony that began in Kedarnath was unending.
Have they brought all yatris from Kedarnath? Perhaps not. Some pilgrims were still reported to be in Bhairav Ghati and beyond. With the monsoon beginning, they would be needing immediate help. They might not be having any food, shelter and warm clothes. Who is going to provide all that?
And what about the dead still buried in Kedarnath area? The bodies have begun to decay and stink. Army officers say unless they are cleared in the next two to three days, a massive attack of infections may engulf the entire state.
It’s only on the fourth and the fifth day that some NDRF teams were sent to Guptkashi, Kedarghati, Gauri Kund and Gangotri areas. Doctors’ teams from the Indian Medical Association, AIIMS, Gangaram (New Delhi) too arrived at some places like Guptkashi. But the ordeal of the pilgrims at Gauri Kund, Ram Bari, and Jungle Chatti remained unspeakably painful. No shelter, no tents, out in the open without even a sheet of cloth to cover in that wintry, windy climate. The shopkeepers, lodge-owners, were either dead or gone to safety.
Everywhere it was a spine-chilling reign of fear, bad memories and hopelessness. People were defecating anywhere. Water was down there in the Mandakini river. No one was in a condition to hold the hands of the other. A chopper came but the minister took his two relatives and flew away. More sorties and more chaos. Thousands of stranded people, and a clamour to board and leave the hell. The ‘me-first’ push of the crowd eager to reach a safer zone can’t be described, it can only be felt.
The only gods of succour and life-providing bliss were the men in olive green, the army, the ITBP personnel and the RSS swayamsevaks. Like angels they did everything that was possible in that situation. RSS youngsters were the first to reach Gauri Kund and provide food, water and solace to dejected, fatigued, yatris enveloped in hopelessness. And so were the Gayatri Parivar, local NGOs, the police association, college student unions, etc. It’s a tragedy that driven by hate and an ideological apartheid, the wonderful and selfless contribution of the RSS was completely ignored by the media, though the army men gave them a hug and cooperated with them.
The IAF and army saved thousands of people. Crossing ferocious streams and rivers on a string of wire with old, young and the children clinging to them; like monkey cubs, they dawned on the scene as angels. But too many were to be rescued and too less was the number in proportion to the need and calamity-struck people.
The security personnel manning the air-rescue had to have some rule — and one was to get the women, aged and ailing onboard first. It divided the families. Men and many times young women of the family were left behind. Seemingly young were asked to trek down up to Sonprayag from Gauri Kund, about 14 to 16 km, passing through a bit of forest and negotiating a high hill. In Gangnani area, seemingly youthful ones had to trek approximately 75 km to reach safety.
Though some said it was forgotten that after a painful stretch of five days, without food, even the young were half-dead. The mental stress, deadly dance of agony, and dark fears of life coming slowly to a painful end sap away all the energy that you once had.
But they had no other alternative. The forces that were there to provide safety were left with no other option.
Still some were lucky to be airlifted and some had to walk down to Gupt Kashi. They were a picture of lifeless, darkened and blank-eyed moving bodies.
They needed a shoulder and a few words of consolation.
They needed a blanket of hope and warmth, the hug of a relation. A relationship of being a fellow Indian.
Image: A frail woman being helped to safety In Uttarakhand
http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand4.jpg
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The people of Gupt Kashi did try to help them wonderfully. The city, a small buzzing town of pundits, ritual performers, shopkeepers of religious needs like dhoop, agarbattis, pooja samagri, lodge-owners of Kedarnath, helpers, guides, members of temple committee, employees of local government offices was enveloped in grief.
Almost every home in this region, particularly Gupt Kashi and Ukhimath, has lost someone in the family.
They were desperately scouring the lists getting updated every few hours to find if their relatives’ names were there. The town was closed down. No one had the courage to do business when the lights in their homes had died.
Still they were the young and the old of Gupt Kashi, who came out to help forlorn pilgrims. They began a free langar, started missing persons search centre, 24-hour announcements were made of the list of arrived pilgrims and missing names. Medicines were provided free. The RSS volunteers were as usual doing their bit. Providing food, blankets, shelter and guidance. They were the first to reach Gauri Kund, the point where the rescued pilgrims were brought from Jungle Chatti. Hungry, dejected, shocked with grief, fatigued and bewildered at being still alive after having spent six days amidst decaying corpses.
Everything was needed more and everything available was just not sufficient. The town never had the attention of governors sitting at the Dehradun secretariat. In spite of being the centre of gravity for all things happening at Kedarnath, the feeder city to pilgrimage for all purposes, it abysmally lacked in infrastructure. A very unreliable power supply, no solar alternative, no toilets, no city cleaning mechanism, and not even an iota of a disaster management centre.
The government camps for rescued pilgrims had no power supply. When I visited in the evening, candles were being provided to some. Imagine a people just arrived rescued from the jaws of death, and many of them had seen their father, mother, brother, sister, wife, husband dying before their eyes and they had to leave their dead bodies either unattended or had them immersed in the Mandakini without being able to even perform the last rites.
These were the people stationed in the clumsy, dark, and stable-like rooms without a proper toilet facility. A few toilets, in the school, were rendered useless due to paucity of water and non-functional flush. Fatigued and barely able to walk, pilgrims had to ease themselves in the open, on the outskirts of the camp, which was an Inter college building.
And the worst was not yet over. They couldn’t speak to their relatives on phone — mobile phones were not working. BSNL was the only source of some hope, to bring cheer on the faces of their anxious relatives back home, but without power most couldn’t recharge their mobiles. Almost ninety nine percent had got their mobile phones soaked in rain water and besides, the other private mobile phone operators were simply mercilessly insensitive to the tragedy. ‘Happy to help’ meant a hoax call for all of us. They could have had a special arrangement to get the ‘tower’ activated, facilitating communications to the pilgrims. But no one came forward to help them in the hour they needed it most. The first thing, after having survived the unspeakable ordeal, a pilgrim would have liked to do is to speak to his near and dear ones. But we Indians, the companies we own — Vodafone, Tata, Reliance – simply didn’t care.
Nilesh Bharane, the effervescent superintendent of police manning the Gupt Kashi helipad did try the satellite phone to get the Sonis of Gujarat to speak their Mumbai kin but ultimately had to go to a corner of the airfield where like voodoo magic, the signal, feeble though, came through and we saw the Sonis speaking to their folk through intermittent sobs. They had lost their father at Kedarnath.

Image: A large number of pilgrims are still to be evacuated from the heights in Uttarakhand

http://im.rediff.com/news/2013/jun/27uttarakhand5.jpg

 
Each yatri had to tell more than his and her story. Heaven it was once which has turned into a burial ground for the living. With all the advancements in technology, all that glib talk of disaster management, the towering Indian conquering the world with his brilliance and high-end acumen, the fact is we failed our people in crisis. Ultimately the armed forces had to be deployed, who emerged as the new gods.
With the instruments available, within the framework of the existing infrastructure and trained, untrained, manpower at hand, everyone did his best. If the RSS and BJP were there in the forefront of relief work, the Congress and many other organisations too worked at the ground level and I went to them, shook hands and appreciated their efforts unhesitatingly. They are Indians, and should we get into the murky blame game and one-upmanship because we do not belong to their ideology? That would be demeaning to our own noble intentions.
We must salute the spirit of service in everyone who went there and did his bit — if the army, IAF are everyone’s heroes, the police, local employees, district magistrates and officers drawn from various departments tried to help. If the Gauri Kund hospital saw everybody gone to safety, there was one pathologist who refused to leave and nursed single-handedly the rescued yatris coming from Jungle Chatti area.
There are hundreds of such small stories of heroes who made a big difference. The IAF couple who flew sorties to bring back yatris, the Jha-Janamejay duo (DM and SP) in Tehri who got the crucial Mayala road opened to Gupt Kashi, which effectively became a lifeline to rescue work and outflow of yatris.
In times of any huge crisis, people naturally panic and need immediate help. It’s not possible sometimes. Still, I sincerely feel, with no offence to the heroes and every one of those who worked to help, we were lacking in an infrastructure that could have responded to such a situation rapidly. At the end of the day, everything depended on the army and IAF. It was the same in 1940, in 1960, in 1970 and so on.
There are lessons to be learnt. How not to politicise a relief operation, keep the communication channels on in the gravest of situations, have the disaster management team professionally stationed at every vulnerable place, regulate the inflow ofyatris like Kailash and Amarnath Yatras, provide the best of infrastructure to these border areas visited by millions, train the civil servants to be polite and responsive to the common people, and a political leadership that loves to work and mingle with the masses.
Tarun Vijay is member of Parliament, Rajya Sabha; member, Parliamentary Consultative Committee on the Ministry of External Affairs; member, Parliamentary Standing Committee on the Ministry of Human Resource Development; member, Parliamentary Group on India China Friendship; Hon Director, Dr Syama Prasad Mookerjee Research Foundation.

 

Jumbo Vegetables


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Life Past vs Present


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Getting Old Be bold writing your will pl. Hold


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Here is an absolute pearl of wisdom sent by a dear friend. This applies to all of us, our parents, siblings andeven our kids.
 

At their 54th anniversary, my friends made a decision to distribute their
combined assets among their living heirs. Their rationale, Para walang gulo. (To avoid trouble). They added one proviso: While still alive, income
from these properties will be used to maintain ourpresent lifestyle
inclusive of medical expenses, extravagant trips andunlimited shopping.

That’s easy, replied the heirs. The income was substantial to indulge the
old folks with a bonus that the heirs can use in anymanner they wanted.

The first year passed without a hitch, but soon the problem surfaced. Each
child used all kinds of tactics to keep the money fromhis parents. It
reached a point where the poor retirees had to beg forsustenance, robbing
them of the dignity they worked hard to uphold.

What went wrong?

Bad decision,   said a cautious friend who warned the couple of this scenario. Children are so unreliable when it comes to inherited money. Money
received, which was not expected and not a direct result of something they
worked for, is not given the same value as money earned with their own
sweat and tears. They lose their sense of propriety;gratitude is tainted
by greed and decency gone. This is compounded by in-laws who can tilt or
convince their respective spouses to throw out good sense and filial
affection like soiled rugs, Honey, they’re going to die anyway, so why
waste good money on them?

To avoid falling into this vulnerable, pitiful state, keep these 10 tips in
mind:

1. Do not retire.    If you’re over-aged, retire and get all the benefits but
find another income-generating job or open a business that will keep you
active physically and mentally. Travel and bond with true friends, play a
sport, learn a new hobby and volunteer in your community or parish. Don’t
loaf around. Your spouse will hate you because you’ve become a sloppy,
listless bum with nothing good to say about the household and things that
you never bothered about before. Solve crossword puzzles, play Scrabble,
write your memoirs, and above all, read …this will keep you alert and
keep Alzheimer’s at bay.

2. Live in your own place   to enjoy independence, privacy and a solo life.
If you move in with your children, your rank or degree of importance is
reduced to that of a bed spacer who has no place of honor or, worse, like
crumbling furniture merely displayed with no added value. Might you kowtow
to conform to their own rules that are not kind, considerate or mindful of
you? If you witness your children engaged in a war of will and wits with
your grandchildren, whom will you side with? Will they even appreciate your
arbitration? Remind your children that silence is not a sign of weakness;
you are merely processing data that is taking longer to complete.

3. Hold on to your nest egg, bank deposits and assets.                 If you want to help
your children, do give, but not to the extent that you wipe out your life’s
earnings, singing heroically not a shirt on my back nor a penny to my name.
Staying solvent and in the black is a good hedge against all kinds of
tempests. You will sleep better, you will not be afraid to express your
opinion and you will be confident about yourself.

4. Don’t believe  your children’s promise to care for you when you grow old.
Priorities change. Many children are not guilt-ridden or filled with a
sense of moral obligation when the wife and offspring take top billing in
their lives. There are still children who would consider it a privilege to
show compassion, genuine love and deep concern for their parents but be
warned that not all children think alike.

5. Expand your circle of friends to include young ones who will definitely
outlive your old BFFs. Keep up with new inventions, trends, music and
lifestyle including all the scams and schemes you should guard against.
Remember that when you mix with the young, you also open a fresh avenue to
channel your thoughts, experiences and values through so that the lessons
you learned are not lost, forgotten or buried with you.

6. Be well groomed and smelling fresh of spring water all the time. There’s
nothing more depressing than seeing people exhale when you walk by because
you reek of baul (camphor chest) or lupa (dirt). Old age or bust, don’t
look and smell like a corpse when you’re not one yet.

7. Do not meddle in the life of your children. If they ask for your
counsel, give it, but be ready to accept that they may not take it. Their
situations in life cannot be compared to the situations that you
experienced in your life. The playing field has changed and they need to
develop their own set of survival skills. If you raised them to be street
smart, they can handle themselves in tough situations and be able to read
people. Champion and encourage their dreams and desires but on their own
terms.

8. Do not use old age as your shield and justification for turning grumpy.
There’s nothing more annoying than an arrogant, old fool. Welcome each day
as another chance to be kind and forgiving, to yourself and to others.

9. Listen to what others may say. Do not throw your weight around just
because you are a septuagenarian or a nonagenarian. You are not a
depository of knowledge. Even if the roles have been reversed, make growing
old a fun-filled, pleasant experience for you and your brood.

10. Pray always and focus on your eternal life. You will definitely leave
everything behind, a final journey detached from burden and care. Be more
accepting that, sooner, not later, you will croak. Prepare your swan song
with a humble and contrite heart. If you believe in a merciful and loving
God, . 


 Make  a proper  WILL.

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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absolute pearl of wisdom


 

 Here is an absolute pearl of wisdom sent by a dear friend. This applies to all of us, our parents, siblings and even our kids.

 

At their 54th anniversary, my friends made a decision to distribute their
combined assets among their living heirs. Their rationale, Para walang gulo. (To avoid trouble). They added one proviso: While still alive, income
from these properties will be used to maintain ourpresent lifestyle
inclusive of medical expenses, extravagant trips andunlimited shopping.

That’s easy, replied the heirs. The income was substantial to indulge the
old folks with a bonus that the heirs can use in anymanner they wanted.

The first year passed without a hitch, but soon the problem surfaced. Each
child used all kinds of tactics to keep the money fromhis parents. It
reached a point where the poor retirees had to beg forsustenance, robbing
them of the dignity they worked hard to uphold.

What went wrong?

Bad decision,   said a cautious friend who warned the couple of this scenario. Children are so unreliable when it comes to inherited money. Money
received, which was not expected and not a direct result of something they
worked for, is not given the same value as money earned with their own
sweat and tears. They lose their sense of propriety;gratitude is tainted
by greed and decency gone. This is compounded by in-laws who can tilt or
convince their respective spouses to throw out good sense and filial
affection like soiled rugs, Honey, they’re going to die anyway, so why
waste good money on them?

To avoid falling into this vulnerable, pitiful state, keep these 10 tips in
mind:

1. Do not retire.    If you’re over-aged, retire and get all the benefits but
find another income-generating job or open a business that will keep you
active physically and mentally. Travel and bond with true friends, play a
sport, learn a new hobby and volunteer in your community or parish. Don’t
loaf around. Your spouse will hate you because you’ve become a sloppy,
listless bum with nothing good to say about the household and things that
you never bothered about before. Solve crossword puzzles, play Scrabble,
write your memoirs, and above all, read …this will keep you alert and
keep Alzheimer’s at bay.

2. Live in your own place   to enjoy independence, privacy and a solo life.
If you move in with your children, your rank or degree of importance is
reduced to that of a bed spacer who has no place of honor or, worse, like
crumbling furniture merely displayed with no added value. Might you kowtow
to conform to their own rules that are not kind, considerate or mindful of
you? If you witness your children engaged in a war of will and wits with
your grandchildren, whom will you side with? Will they even appreciate your
arbitration? Remind your children that silence is not a sign of weakness;
you are merely processing data that is taking longer to complete.

3. Hold on to your nest egg, bank deposits and assets.                 If you want to help
your children, do give, but not to the extent that you wipe out your life’s
earnings, singing heroically not a shirt on my back nor a penny to my name.
Staying solvent and in the black is a good hedge against all kinds of
tempests. You will sleep better, you will not be afraid to express your
opinion and you will be confident about yourself.

4. Don’t believe  your children’s promise to care for you when you grow old.
Priorities change. Many children are not guilt-ridden or filled with a
sense of moral obligation when the wife and offspring take top billing in
their lives. There are still children who would consider it a privilege to
show compassion, genuine love and deep concern for their parents but be
warned that not all children think alike.

5. Expand your circle of friends to include young ones who will definitely
outlive your old BFFs. Keep up with new inventions, trends, music and
lifestyle including all the scams and schemes you should guard against.
Remember that when you mix with the young, you also open a fresh avenue to
channel your thoughts, experiences and values through so that the lessons
you learned are not lost, forgotten or buried with you.

6. Be well groomed and smelling fresh of spring water all the time. There’s
nothing more depressing than seeing people exhale when you walk by because
you reek of baul (camphor chest) or lupa (dirt). Old age or bust, don’t
look and smell like a corpse when you’re not one yet.

7. Do not meddle in the life of your children. If they ask for your
counsel, give it, but be ready to accept that they may not take it. Their
situations in life cannot be compared to the situations that you
experienced in your life. The playing field has changed and they need to
develop their own set of survival skills. If you raised them to be street
smart, they can handle themselves in tough situations and be able to read
people. Champion and encourage their dreams and desires but on their own
terms.

8. Do not use old age as your shield and justification for turning grumpy.
There’s nothing more annoying than an arrogant, old fool. Welcome each day
as another chance to be kind and forgiving, to yourself and to others.

9. Listen to what others may say. Do not throw your weight around just
because you are a septuagenarian or a nonagenarian. You are not a
depository of knowledge. Even if the roles have been reversed, make growing
old a fun-filled, pleasant experience for you and your brood.

10. Pray always and focus on your eternal life. You will definitely leave
everything behind, a final journey detached from burden and care. Be more
accepting that, sooner, not later, you will croak. Prepare your swan song
with a humble and contrite heart. If you believe in a merciful and loving
God, . 

 
 Make  a proper  WILL.
 

An energy storage box of the future, invented by an Indian


” } Google+

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An energy storage box of the future, invented by an Indian

Subject: An energy storage box of the future, invented by an Indian!-

Dear friends,
            Greetings to you !
 Please find given below the link to the youtube video about the ” Bloom Box ” invented by our Indian, specially our RECTIAN Mr.Sridharan ( Regional Engineering College, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu State ). This is a 14 min video show and there are more presentations on the right side or at the end of the show.

 This is one of the greatest scientific development in green power generation and benefit our world society in future.
 Please view this video and pass this to others too.

 With best wishes and regards
 SIVA-RMH TRICHY

Please click on the link given below
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shkFDPI6kGE
Bloom Box: The Alternative Energy that Terrifies Obama 

(14′  03″)
 The Bloom Box is 10 times cheaper than an invertor which is basically storing electricity from the grid for which you pay and a recurring capital expenditure every 2/3 years to purchase new batteries.

__._,_.___

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Indian Monsoon


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Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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An energy storage box of the future, invented by an Indian


Subject: An energy storage box of the future, invented by an Indian!-

Dear friends,
            Greetings to you !
 Please find given below the link to the youtube video about the ” Bloom Box ” invented by our Indian, specially our RECTIAN Mr.Sridharan ( Regional Engineering College, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu State ). This is a 14 min video show and there are more presentations on the right side or at the end of the show.

 This is one of the greatest scientific development in green power generation and benefit our world society in future.
 Please view this video and pass this to others too.

 With best wishes and regards
 SIVA-RMH TRICHY

 
Please click on the link given below
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shkFDPI6kGE
Bloom Box: The Alternative Energy that Terrifies Obama 

(14′  03″)
 The Bloom Box is 10 times cheaper than an invertor which is basically storing electricity from the grid for which you pay and a recurring capital expenditure every 2/3 years to purchase new batteries.

__._,_.___

 

Uttarakhand- A Story of Life and Death, Brave hearts Indian Army Savior of Human Lives


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Being Happy means choosing between SPACE and TIME.
Do you want to cause Happiness WHERE ever you go or WHEN ever you go




The Army’s Rescue operations in Utharakhand.

 


Rescue operation in Uttarakhand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chopper
Uttarakhand floods
 
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In a significant breakthrough for rescue efforts in flood-hit Uttarakhand, an alternative road link to the Kedarnath shrine's base camp was opened on Friday by the Army, enabling the evacuation of thousands of pilgrims stranded in the worst-affected area for days without enough food and water.  An ITBP jawan rescue an old aged woman pilgrim at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand. (PTI)
But the good news was tempered with bad weather being forecast in the flood-affected region from Sunday night, causing the government to ask rescue teams to go full-throttle with their efforts in the 48 hours before that.  Soldiers rescuing people. (AP)
They also said that the evacuation process was almost over in the other badly-affected places such as Gangotri, Govindghat, Ghagharia, Gaurikund-Karnprayag and Joshimath.  Rescued flood affected pilgrims alight from a chopper in Guptkashi, in Uttarakhand. The heavy rains caused by the annual monsoon have left more than 500 people dead and stranded tens of thousands, mostly pilgrims, in India''s northern mountainous region, officials said Friday. (AP Photo)
Uttarakhand floods: Rescue operations resume after brief suspension due to bad weather
A file photo of stranded tourists being rescued by army personnel in Uttarakhand. The rescue operation is one of the largest in several decades. Courtesy: Indian Army
 
 
Rescue operations resume in Uttarakhand
Army has launched one of the biggest human rescue operations in Uttarakhand. It today mobilized troops for rescue and relief efforts, as it simultaneously reached out to over 8000 people on all four different axes, viz, Rishikesh ? Uttarkashi ? Harsil ? Gangotri axis; Rudraprayag ? Kedarnath axis, Joshimath ? Badrinath axis and Dharchhula ? Tawaghat axis in Pithoragarh district
Uttarakhand survivors recount horror: 'Kill my kids if you can't save them'
 
 
Complete co-ordination in Uttarakhand rescue operations: Government
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A woman is helped by a soldier to climb down a hill during a rescue operation at   Govindghat in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand June 21, 2
 
An IAF chopper lands for rescue operations at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand, on Saturday.
 
 
 
 
Uttarakhand Floods : Rescue efforts begin as weather clear
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

– 

 


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Indian Armed Forces rescue more than a lakh of people


Being Happy means choosing between SPACE and TIME.
Do you want to cause Happiness WHERE ever you go or WHEN ever you go
 


The Army’s Rescue operations in Utharakhand.

 

Rescue operation in Uttarakhand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chopper
Uttarakhand floods
 
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In a significant breakthrough for rescue efforts in flood-hit Uttarakhand, an alternative road link to the Kedarnath shrine's base camp was opened on Friday by the Army, enabling the evacuation of thousands of pilgrims stranded in the worst-affected area for days without enough food and water.  An ITBP jawan rescue an old aged woman pilgrim at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand. (PTI)
But the good news was tempered with bad weather being forecast in the flood-affected region from Sunday night, causing the government to ask rescue teams to go full-throttle with their efforts in the 48 hours before that.  Soldiers rescuing people. (AP)
They also said that the evacuation process was almost over in the other badly-affected places such as Gangotri, Govindghat, Ghagharia, Gaurikund-Karnprayag and Joshimath.  Rescued flood affected pilgrims alight from a chopper in Guptkashi, in Uttarakhand. The heavy rains caused by the annual monsoon have left more than 500 people dead and stranded tens of thousands, mostly pilgrims, in India''s northern mountainous region, officials said Friday. (AP Photo)
Uttarakhand floods: Rescue operations resume after brief suspension due to bad weather
A file photo of stranded tourists being rescued by army personnel in Uttarakhand. The rescue operation is one of the largest in several decades. Courtesy: Indian Army
 
 
 
Rescue operations resume in Uttarakhand
Army has launched one of the biggest human rescue operations in Uttarakhand. It today mobilized troops for rescue and relief efforts, as it simultaneously reached out to over 8000 people on all four different axes, viz, Rishikesh ? Uttarkashi ? Harsil ? Gangotri axis; Rudraprayag ? Kedarnath axis, Joshimath ? Badrinath axis and Dharchhula ? Tawaghat axis in Pithoragarh district
Uttarakhand survivors recount horror: 'Kill my kids if you can't save them'
 
 
Complete co-ordination in Uttarakhand rescue operations: Government
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A woman is helped by a soldier to climb down a hill during a rescue operation at   Govindghat in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand June 21, 2
 
An IAF chopper lands for rescue operations at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand, on Saturday.
 
 
 
 
Uttarakhand Floods : Rescue efforts begin as weather clear
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

– 


 
 

Never Say Die


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Poon Lim 1942 Stuck on raft in the south Atlantic Sea for 133 days.
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Steven Callahan 1982 Adrift on a life raft in the Atlantic with only 8 pints of water and 3 lbs of food drifted for 76 days and over 1800 miles of Ocean until he was rescued in the Bahamas.
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The Crew of the Commerce 1815-17 US sailors marched across the sahara after enslaved by Bedouins. One man tried to eat his own arm and others drank camel urine.
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Aaron Ralston 2003 Hiker traps his arm while climbing down Blue John Canyon in Utah. After 5 days he frees himself by amputating his arm with a blunt knife.
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The Donnor Party. Pioneers who in 1846 gets trapped by snow in Sierra, Nevada survives by resorting to cannibalism. 48 out of 87 survived.
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Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 1972 Plane carrying 45 people crashes into the Andes. Resorting to cannibalism they endure 72 days in mountains. 15 survived.
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Ernest Shackleton 1914 Atlantic explorers abandon ship and live on ice before mounting a 16 day 800 mile crossing of the ocean.
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John McCain 1967 Senator John McCain survived 5 and a half years in Hoa Lo Prison during vietnam war. Both arms and a leg broken, bayoneted and beaten by North Vietnamese army. Spends two years in solitary confinment he refuses to go when released while other captured before him remained in captivity.
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Douglas Mawson 1912 Antartic explorer loses companions during expedition and spends 30 days covering 100 miles before finding a rescue party.
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John Colter 1808 captured by blackfeet indians and stripped naked he becomes the subject of a manhunt and manages to escape.
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Leonid Rogozov 1960 Stationed on the Antartic russian performed operation on himself after showing signs of appendicitis.
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Slavomir Rawicz 1940 Escapes from Siberian gulag and marches over 4,000 miles on foot across frozen tundra, gobi desert, through Tibet over Himalayan Mountains to British India.
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Shin Dong-Hyuk 2005 Escapes from a prison camp in North Korea. Crawls over his partner who died, through an electric fence to freedom.
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1st Marine Division 1950 Chosin Reservoir Marines fight a grueling battle in a retreat with over 100,000 chinese soldiers in North Korea and survives.
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Alexander Selkirk 1704-09 Gets stranded on an island this scottish sailor spent his time reading the bible.
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Hugh Glass 1823 Mauled by a bear and left for dead he crawls for six months and 100 miles before reaching safety.
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Joe Simpson 1985 Breaks leg attempting to climb the Siula Grande. Crawls 5 miles in three days and survives.
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Juliane Koepche 1971 Teenager survives crash of Lansa Flight 508 and treks through the peruvian rainforest before being rescued.
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Yossi Ghinsber 1981 Gets separted from his travel companions in Bolivan Amazon he takes 3 weeks wandering alone before being found.
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Jon Baalsrud 1943 Sails to Norway and gets ambushed by Nazis. Flees with Nazis’ giving chase. Survives an avalanche, suffering frostbite and snow blindness he makes it over Norwegion Mts and tundra to safety.
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Beck Weathers 1996 Goes on expedition into Mt. Everest and 8 in his party die. Spends 18 hrs in subzero temps before staggering into camp. Suffered severe frostbite, corneal lacerations and hypothermia. Underwent ten surgeries, entire right hand and most of left arm amputated.
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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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New Rules for Cancellation of Railway tickets from July1,2013


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Revised Refund Rules for Railway Tickets will Come into Effect From 1st July 2013

Revised Refund Rules for Railway Tickets – Ministry of Railways has revised and amended Refund Rules in a very comprehensive manner and notified them which shall come into force with effect from 1.7.2013. The amendments made in the Refund Rules are aimed at simplification, efficiency in processing and reduction of bogus refund claims.
Railway Passengers (Cancellation of ticket and Refund of fare) Rules, 1998 have not been substantially revised in the last 15 years during which period a large number of changes have taken place in the ticketing system of Indian Railways. Firstly,Computerised Passenger Reservation System (PRS) as well as ComputerisedUnreserved Ticketing System (UTS) have proliferated. Reservation through internet has also been introduced through which 45% of the total reserved tickets are issued. Integrated Train Enquiry System — 139 is functional through which ticket status can be obtained through SMS. The above developments warranted that the refund rules be revised comprehensively.
The major changes in the existing rules and the amendments in refund rules are as under:-
Unused (unreserved) tickets on which no reservation has been made:
Existing rule
Amended rule
 If a ticket on which no reservation of a seat or berth has been made is presented to the station master for cancellation refund of fare shall be made on every such ticket after deducting the clerkage.(i) within three hours after the actual departure of the train for which the ticket is issued or

(ii) for any ticket valid for the whole day, within three hours after the actual departure of the last train of the day for the destination station
If a ticket on which no reservation of a seat or berth has been made is presented for cancellation, refund of fare shall be made on every such ticket after deducting the clerkage.(i)The ticket shall be presented for cancellation within three hours of issue of ticket.

(ii) In case of tickets issued in advance the ticket is presented upto 2400 hours of the day preceding the day of journey. 
Unused tickets on which reservation has been made:
Unused tickets on which reservation has been made:(i) if the ticket is presented for cancellation more than forty eight hours instead of the existing 24 hours in advance of the scheduled departure of the train, a minimum per passenger cancellation charge shall be deducted at the flat rate of rupees one hundred and twenty for air-conditioned first class/executive class, rupees one hundred for air-conditioned-II tier/first class, rupees ninety for air-conditioned III-tier/ 3 economy/air-conditioned chair car, rupees sixty for sleeper class and rupees thirty for second class.
(ii) if the ticket is presented for cancellation between forty eight hours and upto six hours instead of existing 24 hours and upto 4 hours before the scheduled departure ofthe train, cancellation charge shall be twenty five per cent of the fare subject to a minimum of the cancellation charge.
(iii) if the ticket is presented for cancellation within six hours instead of existing 4 hours before the scheduled departure of the train and upto two hours irrespective of distance instead of existing 3/6/12 hours for distance 200 kms/200-500 kms/500 Kms and above after the actual departure of the train, the cancellation charge shall be fifty per cent of the fare subject to a minimum of the cancellation charge.
(iv) No refund shall be granted on the reserved ticket if it is surrendered for cancellation after two hours of the actual departure of the train.
(v) In case, on a party ticket or a family ticket issued for travel of more than one person, some persons have confirmed reservation and others are on waiting list, full refund of fare, less clerkage, shall be admissible for confirmed passengers also provided that the entire ticket is surrendered for cancellation within six hours instead of existing 4 hours before the scheduled departure of the train and upto two hours instead of existing 3 hours after actual departure of the train”.
Unused waitlisted or RAC tickets:–
Existing rule Revised  rule
If the ticket is presented for cancellation upto 3/6/12 hours for distance 200 kms/200-500 kms/500 Kms and above after the actual departure of the train, except deduction of clerkage;Provided that for night trains leaving between 21.00 hours and 06.00 hours (actual departure), refund shall be admissible at the station within the time limits specified above or within first four hours after the opening of reservation office, whichever is later.  If a Waitlisted/RAC ticket is presented for cancellation, refund of fare shall be admissible after deducting the clerkage.(i) The ticket is presented for cancellationupto three hours after the actual departure of the trainirrespective of the distance.

(ii) The passenger may get the tickets cancelled from any PRS counters or the designated current counters.
(iii) No refund of fare shall be granted on RAC ticket /Waitlisted ticket after three hours of the actual departure of the train.
(iv) In case no current counters are available at journey originating station for night trains leaving between 21.00 hours and 06.00 hours(actual departure , refund shall be admissible at the station within first two hoursafter the opening of reservation office.
(v) In remote and hill areas as identified by the zonal Railways with the prior approval of the General Managers and print in their Time Tables for train leaving between 1900 hoursand 0600 hours(actual departure) refund shall be admissible at the station within first two hours after the opening of reservation/booking office, in case there is no reservation counters/booking office/ current counters. Available in that area.

Cancellation of e- tickets

· The e- ticket may be booked and cancelled through internet and the refund of fare shall be credited to the customer’s account after deducting the charges applicable.
· In case of a confirmed e-ticket, refund of fare shall be granted in accordance with rule for unused tickets on which reservation has been made. In case of RAC e-ticket, refund of fare shall be granted in accordance with rule for unused waitlisted and RAC tickets.
· In case of the waitlisted e-ticket on which status of all the passengers is on waiting listeven after preparation of reservation charts, names of all such passengers booked on that Passenger Name Record (PNR) shall be dropped from the reservation chart and refund of fare shall be credited to the customer’s account after deducting the clerkage.
· In case on a party e-ticket or a family e-ticket issued for travel of more than one person, some persons have confirmed reservation and others are on the list of RAC andwaiting list, then in case of passengers on RAC or waitlisted not travelling, a certificatehas to be obtained from the ticket checking staff to that effect and refund of fare shall be processed online through TDR, indicating the details of the certificate issued by ticket checking staff.
· The online TDR shall be filed upto seventy two hours of actual arrival of the train at passenger’s destination and the original certificate issued by the ticket checking staff is to be sent through post to Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC). The fare shall be refunded by Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) to the customer’s account after due verification.
· In case of e-tickets (confirmed or RAC), if the reservation charts have been prepared, online TDR is required to be filed for obtaining refund. No refund of fare shall be admissible on e- ticket having confirmed reservation in case the request for refund is filed online after two hours of the actual departure of the train.
· No refund of fare shall be admissible on RAC e-tickets in case the request for refund is filed online after three hours of the actual departure of the train.
Refund on Tatkal tickets:
· No refund of fare shall be admissible on confirmed Tatkal ticket.
· In case of Tatkal ticket on waitlist, refund of fare shall be granted in accordance with rule for unused waitlisted or RAC tickets.
· In case on a party Tatkal ticket or a family Tatkal ticket issued for travel for more than one person, some persons have confirmed reservation and others are on waiting list, full refund of fare, less clerkage, shall be admissible for confirmed passengers also provided that the entire Tatkal ticket is surrendered for cancellation within six hours before the scheduled departure of the train or upto two hours of the actual departure of the train.
Postponement or preponement of journey on a reserved, RAC or waitlisted ticket.
The postponement or preponement of journey on confirmed or RAC or waitlisted ticket shall be allowed in the same class and for the same destination instead of any longer distance or any higher class by the same train or by any other train for any subsequent days, subject to condition that the ticket is surrendered during the working hours of reservation office and at least forty eight hours instead of existing 24 hours before the scheduled departure of the train in which originally booked.
Non-commencement or missing of journey due to late running of trains. –
· No cancellation charge or clerkage shall be levied and full fare shall be refunded to all passengers holding reserved, RAC and waitlisted tickets, if the journey is not undertaken due to late running of the train by more than three hours of the scheduled departure of the train from the station commencing the journey subject to condition that the ticket is surrendered upto the actual departure of the train instead of existing 3/6/12 hours for distance 200 kms/200-500 kms/500 Kms and above after the actual departure of the train
· in case of e-tickets, the TDR is filed online before the actual departure of the train for availing full refund.
· In case the ticket is cancelled or surrendered or if the request for refund of fare is filed online after the actual departure of the train, no refund of fare shall be admissible.
Lost, misplaced, torn or mutilated tickets: –
If the reservation status of a lost, misplaced, torn or mutilated ticket, at the time of receipt of the application for issuance of a duplicate ticket for the purpose of undertaking journey, is confirmed or RAC and that the duplicate ticket is sought before preparation of reservation chart of the concerned train, the station master shall issue a duplicate ticket in lieu of the original ticket on payment of rupees fifty per passenger in case of second and sleeper class and rupees one hundred per passenger for other classes instead of existing clerkage charge.
Application for refund of Passenger Reservation System (PRS) tickets in other circumstances:-
For refund of fare under circumstances other than those specified in these rules or under circumstances like ‘bandh’ or agitations or floods, etc., the passengers could not reach the reservation counter or station or current counters for cancellation of tickets, in those cases, a TDR shall be issued to the passenger and the passenger may apply for refund of fare within ten days instead existing 90 days from the day of commencement of journey to the Chief Commercial Manager (Refunds) of the railway administration under whose jurisdiction the TDR issuing station comes, enclosing the original TDR. The TDR shall be issued only upto three days instead of existing 30 days after the scheduled departure of the train.
Source : PIB

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