WHY PEOPLE LEAVE THEIR SHOES, CHAPPALS OUTSIDE, GURDWARA, TEMPLE, MOSQUE


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Why do people leave shoes outside temples, gurudwaras, mosques?

Since childhood this is taught to us one of the good habit which is purely scientific as all of
 us knows that is not to wear sandals inside the temple and in house and even for any religious ceremonies …this is there in hindu temples, gurudwaras, mosque and other religious temples too as wearing shoes spread dust and many other microorganisms which might give rise to infections as many people visit temples and religious places and at homes there are kids who get infected very fast some old people as well as other members ..here it goes

Chappals or Shoes are generally made up of rubber or leather or sometimes even animal skin is used to make shoes. All these things are considered impure and at the same time as you know, shoes and chappals are used everywhere hence they tend to get all the impurities like dirt, germs etc., which spoil the pure environment of the temple and is the source of negative energy.

The place of Worship is the most sacred place and hence in order to keep this negative energy out of the temple, foot-wears are not allowed inside religious places and temples.

This concept extends to interactions between individuals. Touching another person with your shoe or foot may be considered an insult. If done accidently an apology should be made by touching one’s right hand to the spot on the individual that was offended and then lightly using the same hand to touch your own left eye and then the right. Also one should never point their foot at another person nor spread their feet before an altar.
Normally the foot are main doors for our body to transmit outside good and bad into us.

If we are cleaning our foots before entering to the house after outside work, (we are believing)many diseases are invited. Similarly our bare footed legs will inspire much with the sanctity of temples. Another thing it is one way respect to God.

In this same spirit shoes should be taken off when entering a temple. It represents slipping off of the material world when one enters a spiritual realm.

They should be removed without using one’s hands. If unavoidable hands should be washed before the individual touches anything else within the structure. Temples usually have a place to leave shoes and in certain cold weather ones wooden shoes may be provided. These will be exchanged for one’s own shoes upon leaving.

The practice of removing shoes is carried over to most Hindu homes. If it isn’t obvious where you can leave your shoes one should ask. It is considered improper to carry them from room to room.

Foot-wears are considered to be unholy and temples are holy places which are full of positive vibrations.Therefore, before we enter temples we should not only remove your shoes or slippers but also wash our feet so that we don’t spoil the holiness of those places.For example, we would have walked with the shoes or slipper before entering the temple and unknowingly we would have stamped on some dirt and carry it to religious places is not ethical.

Importantly, traditionally our forefathers had followed the rule of entering the temples bare-footed. So, definitely there must be some special reasons.

VERY IMPORTANT:
Temples are the place that contains pure vibrations. In olden days temples are constructed in such a way to create vibration. They enter our body through our foots.

Hindus believe that God is the supreme of the Universe and we all are here only because of his blessings, we need to behave in a good manner inside the temples.Going to the temple with a clean body. Legs and hands shall be cleaned at entering the temple.

 
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