7 ways to maintain Positive Attitude


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in today’s life when one is thronged with worries and tensions all around, it is very difficult to maintain a positive attitude. And often the more you try and be positive, the more it seems the negative energy around you gains strength. So here are 7 ways to change our modus operandi, be positive and work towards a healthier lifestyle.
Do Not Wait for Happiness.
Do not wait for good things to happen to you. You need to work towards happiness. You need to create a happy environment around you today to remain happy tomorrow. This is called an attitude. If you adopt a positive attitude, life becomes a rewarding game instead of a challenge to ‘get through.’

Clarify and Prioritize
Learn to know what you want. If you know what you expect from yourself, your future becomes clear and your goals become attainable
• Clarify your purpose : A purpose is something you fulfill each moment when you are in balance with your life. (A purpose is a simple, positive statement of why you are here). A purpose isn’t a goal statement, which one can achieve.
• Discover your purpose: by identifying & prioritizing your most important roles in life (at home, at work, community etc) List the positive qualities that you aspire to possess: Honesty, Philanthropic, Accommodating, Tolerant etc.
• Visualize your future, with a clear picture in your mind of what you want to accomplish in your lifetime (you can become what you think you are and what you see). One of the most powerful techniques for achieving life goals is visualization (creating a mental image of something happening in future). Believing in and seeing your dreams can motivate you to become what you want to be.
• Set goals for yourself (To help your dreams for the future become a reality, you need to set short & long term goals) to stay on course.
To provide steady fuel for your energy, create a list of long term goals to be accomplished in life time & break them into several interim short term goals to help you chart your progress.

Be Resilient
Resilient people are those who face setbacks but ultimately, with perseverance, recover from them. Try and be strong and face life’s difficulties as challenges; respond accordingly with action, rather than with fear, self-pity, inferiority or blame. While life can be very challenging, an important step in becoming more resilient is to develop the habit of positive self talk and to remind yourself that you are strong and can grow stronger and wiser as you handle life’s challenges.

Self Pep Talk
One’s inner dialogue is one’s biggest strength and critic. Listen to your inner self and talk to it. Motivate yourself rather than getting motivated by others. It is the inner voice that makes us critical of ourselves. Rule your inner voice!

Laugh Away
Humor is the best medicine. Make laughter a part of your day. Laughter is known to be a mood elevator. When feeling low, read funny stories or go through a joke book. Allow yourself to open up. See the funny side of things and you will realize, life is a complex, yet funny game.

Seize the day
Carpe Diem, as the proverb goes. Always enjoy the moment. Do not worry about your past or future. Live for the day. What has happened is irreversible and what will happen is unknown, so try and enjoy what you have. Like someone has rightly said:
“The past is history, the future is mystery.
Today is a Gift, That is why we call it the Present”

Be an Optimist
This is the golden rule to maintaining a positive attitude. Always believe in yourself. Being an optimist does not only mean to see the brighter side of life. To be an optimist means to view the surroundings wherein you maximize your strengths and achievements and minimize your weaknesses and apprehensions.

It is difficult to change yourself in a day But at least give it a try. A positive attitude in life will help you go places. Just curb that fear in you and move towards the right path!!
Remember, I CAN and I WILL



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Positive Power


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A negative outlook usually leads to negative experiences, but taking an optimistic approach to life, 
and everything it throws your way, can reap dividends and lead to positive experiences. 
Some evidence even suggests that being positive makes us happier, and happier people generally live longer!


Be in control of yourself
The biggest difference between people is their attitudes. 
We can be positive or negative, and this is reflected in our enthusiasm for doing things, 
or our response to certain situations. Although you can’t necessarily control the things 
that happen to you, you can control how you react to them. 
For example, if an accident holds you up on your way to work, you are likely to be late 
and quite possibly very angry — but getting angry is wasted energy. 
Have a coping mechanism or strategy — just accept you are going to be late and deal with it.

Don’t dwell on the past
What is gone is gone, and how you deal with the aftermath is the most important thing. 
There is no point apportioning blame, either on yourself or others. You have the power to 
change a situation and move on. It is so easy to say ‘I should have done things differently’ 
with the benefit of hindsight. However, if bad things have happened, look at tomorrow 
at exactly what it is — a new day — in which good things can happen, if you let them.

Get off to the right start
On waking, take some time to lie there and think about the day ahead and your feelings about it. 
Think about your attitude to each aspect of the day and consider if there is any part that you feel 
particularly negative about. If so, think about the best way to deal with the event in this situation, 
but more importantly, where possible, think about how you will manage in the future — is there a way 
of not putting yourself in this situation again in the future?

Enlist help
If there is any particular task that you really can’t face alone, then enlist some help. 
There is nothing like getting someone else on board to help out to make you feel more positive 
about tackling a job — be it at home or at work. 
You could even try enlisting the help of your family — don’t be a martyr and end up feeling 
miserable about your chores and responsibilities.

Be pro-active
If there are things in your day that you are truly going to struggle to be positive about, 
try and work out what is it about them that makes you feel that way. Is there anything 
you could do that could change your attitude towards it? 
If you regularly dread your commute to work, then perhaps you could consider 
a different mode of transport. 
If it is your job that is the problem, then is it perhaps time to start looking for work elsewhere.

Carry happy memories
If you are ever feeling negative, nothing quite perks you up like a happy thought. 
Think of the positive times in your life and when you were at your happiest. 
You might be able to prompt your memory and happy feelings by carrying a cherished item 
or photograph, or even by listening to a favourite song with positive associations.

Tomorrow is another day
Aside from famously being the last line in Gone with the Wind, this truism should be used in your daily approach. 
However bad your previous day may have been (and you might be feeling your previous optimism didn’t pay off), 
it is worth persisting rather than letting yourself turn towards your dark side.

Thinking positively is about making a commitment to yourself to get the most out of your day. 
It is about being enthusiastic, keeping your mind focused on important things and developing 
strategies for dealing with problems. 
The best advice is to do your best each day and try not to look back at things that 
happen to you along the way — just reflect on them in a positive learning way.

Of a person’s mood, Abraham Lincoln once said, ‘Most folks are about as happy as they make up their minds to be’. 
It’s up to you as to how you feel, and how you act. In turn, this will affect the way in which others react towards you. 
Remember, if you always do what you’ve always done, then you’ll always have what you’ve always had.



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Be positive


I remember my dad teaching me the power of language at a very young age. Not only did my dad understand that specific words affect our mental pictures, but he understood words are a powerful programming factor in lifelong success.
One particularly interesting event occurred when I was eight. As a kid, I was always climbing trees, poles, and literally hanging around upside down from the rafters of our lake house. So, it came to no surprise for my dad to find me at the top of a 30-foot tree swinging back and forth. My little eight-year-old brain didn’t realize the tree could break or I could get hurt. I just thought it was fun to be up so high.

My older cousin, Tammy, was also in the same tree. She was hanging on the first big limb, about ten feet below me. Tammy’s mother also noticed us at the exact time my dad did. About that time a huge gust of wind came over the tree. I could hear the leaves start to rattle and the tree begin to sway. I remember my dad’s voice over the wind yell, “Bart, Hold on tightly.” So I did. The next thing I know, I heard Tammy screaming at the top of her lungs, laying flat on the ground. She had fallen out of the tree.
I scampered down the tree to safety. My dad later told me why she fell and I did not. Apparently, when Tammy’s mother felt the gust of wind, she yelled out, “Tammy, don’t fall!” And Tammy did fall. My dad then explained to me that the mind has a very difficult time processing a negative image.


In fact, people who rely on internal pictures cannot see a negative at all. In order for Tammy to process the command of not falling, her nine-year-old brain had to first imagine falling, then try to tell the brain not to do what it just imagined. Whereas, my eight-year-old brain instantly had an internal image of me hanging on tightly.
This concept is especially useful when you are attempting to break a habit or set a goal. You can’t visualize not doing something.
The only way to properly visualize not doing something is to actually find a word for what you want to do and visualize that.
 
For example, when I was thirteen years old, I played for my junior high school football team. I tried so hard to be good, but I just couldn’t get it together at that age. I remember hearing the words run through my head as I was running out for a pass, “Don’t drop it!” Naturally, I dropped the ball. My coaches were not skilled enough to teach us proper “self-talk.” They just thought some kids could catch and others couldn’t. I’ll never make it pro, but I’m now a pretty good Sunday afternoon football player, because all my internal dialogue is positive and encourages me to win.
I wish my dad had coached me playing football instead of just climbing trees. I might have had a longer football career. If our parents can set a lifetime of programming with one wrong statement, imagine the kind of programming you are doing on a daily basis with your own internal dialogue.
Here is a list of Toxic Vocabulary words. Notice when you or other people use them.
   Ø But: Negates any words that are stated before it.
   Ø Try: Presupposes failure.
   Ø If: Presupposes that you may not.
   Ø Might: It does nothing definite. It leaves options for your listener..
   Ø Would Have: Past tense that draws attention to things that didn’t actually happen.
   Ø Should Have: Past tense that draws attention to things that didn’t actually happen implies guilt
  Ø Could Have: Past tense that draws attention to things that didn’t actually happen but the person tries to take credit as if it did happen.
 Ø Can’t/Don’t: These words force the listener to focus on exactly the opposite of what you want. This is a classic mistake that parents and coaches make without knowing the damage of this linguistic error.

Example-1:
Toxic phrase: “Don’t drop the ball!”
Likely result: Drops the ball
Better language: “Catch the ball!”* *

Example-2:
Toxic phrase: “You shouldn’t watch so much television.”
Likely result: Watches more television.
Better language: “I read too much television makes people stupid.