Uttarakhand- A Story of Life and Death, Brave hearts Indian Army Savior of Human Lives


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Do you want to cause Happiness WHERE ever you go or WHEN ever you go




The Army’s Rescue operations in Utharakhand.

 


Rescue operation in Uttarakhand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chopper
Uttarakhand floods
 
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In pics: Uttarakhand rescue operations are among Army's largest ever
In a significant breakthrough for rescue efforts in flood-hit Uttarakhand, an alternative road link to the Kedarnath shrine's base camp was opened on Friday by the Army, enabling the evacuation of thousands of pilgrims stranded in the worst-affected area for days without enough food and water.  An ITBP jawan rescue an old aged woman pilgrim at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand. (PTI)
But the good news was tempered with bad weather being forecast in the flood-affected region from Sunday night, causing the government to ask rescue teams to go full-throttle with their efforts in the 48 hours before that.  Soldiers rescuing people. (AP)
They also said that the evacuation process was almost over in the other badly-affected places such as Gangotri, Govindghat, Ghagharia, Gaurikund-Karnprayag and Joshimath.  Rescued flood affected pilgrims alight from a chopper in Guptkashi, in Uttarakhand. The heavy rains caused by the annual monsoon have left more than 500 people dead and stranded tens of thousands, mostly pilgrims, in India''s northern mountainous region, officials said Friday. (AP Photo)
Uttarakhand floods: Rescue operations resume after brief suspension due to bad weather
A file photo of stranded tourists being rescued by army personnel in Uttarakhand. The rescue operation is one of the largest in several decades. Courtesy: Indian Army
 
 
Rescue operations resume in Uttarakhand
Army has launched one of the biggest human rescue operations in Uttarakhand. It today mobilized troops for rescue and relief efforts, as it simultaneously reached out to over 8000 people on all four different axes, viz, Rishikesh ? Uttarkashi ? Harsil ? Gangotri axis; Rudraprayag ? Kedarnath axis, Joshimath ? Badrinath axis and Dharchhula ? Tawaghat axis in Pithoragarh district
Uttarakhand survivors recount horror: 'Kill my kids if you can't save them'
 
 
Complete co-ordination in Uttarakhand rescue operations: Government
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A woman is helped by a soldier to climb down a hill during a rescue operation at   Govindghat in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand June 21, 2
 
An IAF chopper lands for rescue operations at Gauri Kund in Uttarakhand, on Saturday.
 
 
 
 
Uttarakhand Floods : Rescue efforts begin as weather clear
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

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We salute the Indian Army


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For Defense forces secular was an alien word. It has ridiculously been made legitimate by our secular politicians.

In our regiments it was normal that on a religious function, major organizational work was undertaken by jawans from other religions. All felt that it was an honour to do so. 

I suppose it is possible only when officers identify themselves with religion of the troops. In addition all must have feeling of  oneness of God and victory in operations. Both are so sacred we cannot nitpick and question the basics.
—– Forwarded Message —–
Received from an Army officer. He belonged to 8th.JSW. it is ditto for the navy and the airforce.

As a retired Army 0fficer, I never stop marveling at the gullibility of our countrymen to be provoked with alacrity into virulence in the name of religion and regionalism. I have never heard the word ‘secular’ during all my service — and yet, the simple things that are done simply in the army make it appear like an island of sanity in a sea of hatred.

In the Army, each 0fficer identifies with the religion of his troops. In regiments where the soldiers are from more than one religion, the officers — and indeed all jawans attend the weekly religious prayers of all the faiths. In earlier days how many times have I trooped out of the battalion mandir and, having worn my shoes, entered the battalion church or, taking them off again, entered the  Gurudwara next door? A few years ago it all became simpler — Mandirs, Masjids, Gurudwars and Churches began to share premises all over the army, and named  Dharamsthan or Sarvadharamsthal. It saved us the walk.

Perhaps it is so because the Army genuinely believes in two central ‘truths’ — oneness of God and victory in operations. Both are so sacred we cannot nitpick and question the basics.

In fact, sometimes the army mixes up the two! 0n a visit to the holy cave at Amarnath a few years ago I saw a plaque mounted on the side of the hill by a battalion that had once guarded the annual Yatra. It said, ‘Best wishes from -….- battalion. Deployed for Operation Amarnath.

On another instance, I remember a Commanding 0fficer ordered the battalion Maulaviji to conduct the proceedings of Janamashtmi prayers because the panditji had to proceed on leave on compassionate grounds. No eyebrows were raised. It was the most rousing and best-prepared sermon on Lord Krishna I have ever had the pleasure of listening to.

On the Line of Control, a company of Khemkhani Muslim soldiers replaced a Dogra battalion. Over the next few days, the post was shelled heavily by Pakistanis, and there were a few non-fatal casualties. 0ne day, the junior commissioned officer of the company, Subedar Sarwar Khan walked up to the company commander Major Sharma and said, “Sahib, ever since the Dogras left, the mandir has been shut. Why don’t you open it once every evening and do aarti? Why are we displeasing the Gods?”

Major Sharma shamefacedly confessed he did not know all the words of the aarti. Subedar Sarwar went away and that night, huddled over the radio set under a weak lantern light, painstakingly took down the words of the aarti from the post of another battalion!

How many of us know that along the entire border with Pakistan, our troops abstain from alcohol and non-vegetarian food on all Thursdays? The reason: It is called the Peer day — essentially a day of religious significance for the Muslims.

In 1984, after Operation Bluestar there was anguish in the Sikh community over the desecration of the holiest of their shrines. Some of this anger and hurt was visible in the Army too.

I remember the first Sikh festival days after the event — the number of army personnel of every religious denomination that thronged the regimental Gurudwara of the nearest Sikh battalion was the largest I had seen. I distinctly remember each officer and soldier who put his forehead to the ground to pay obeisance appeared to linger just a wee bit longer than usual. Was I imagining this? I do not think so. There was that empathy and caring implicit in the quality of the gesture that appeared to say, “You are hurt and we all understand.”

We were deployed on the Line of Control those days. Soon after the news of disaffection among a small section of Sikh troops was broadcast on the BBC, Pakistani troops deployed opposite the Sikh battalion yelled across to express their ‘solidarity’ with the Sikhs.

The Sikh havildar shouted back that the Pakistanis had better not harbour any wrong notions. “If you dare move towards this post, we will mow you down.”

Finally, a real — and true — gem….

Two boys of a Sikh regiment battalion were overheard discussing this a day before Christmas.

“Why are we having a holiday tomorrow?” asked Sepoy Singh.

“It is Christmas,” replied the wiser Naik Singh.

“But what is Christmas?”

“Christmas,” replied Naik Singh, with his eyes half shut in reverence and hands in a spontaneous prayer-clasp, “is the Guruparb of the Christians.”

 

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