PRISONERS VS EMPLOYEES


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Prisoners v/s Employees… !!

IN PRISON
AT WORK
you spend the majority of your time in an 8’X10′ cell .
you spend most of your time in a 6’X8′ cubicle .. 

IN PRISON
AT WORK
you get three meals a day (free).
you only get a break for one meal and probably have to pay for it yourself .
IN PRISON
AT WORK
you get time off for good behavior.
you get rewarded for good behavior with more WORK.
IN PRISON
AT WORK
a guard locks and unlocks the doors for you ..
you must carry around a security card and unlock open all the doors yourself .
IN PRISON
AT WORK
you can watch TV and play games.
you get fired for watching TV and playing games.

IN PRISON 
they allow your family and    
friends to visit.
AT WORK 
you can not even speak to your family and friends.

IN PRISON
AT WORK
all expenses are paid by taxpayers with no work at all.
You get to pay all the expenses to go to work and then they deduct taxes from your salary to pay for the prisoners.

Humm? 

Which Sounds Better? 

So what are you waiting for………???


Kill your Boss 



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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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PRISONERS VS EMPLOYEES


 

 

Prisoners v/s Employees… !!

IN PRISON AT WORK
you spend the majority of your time in an 8’X10′ cell . you spend most of your time in a 6’X8′ cubicle ..
IN PRISON AT WORK
you get three meals a day (free). you only get a break for one meal and probably have to pay for it yourself .

 

IN PRISON AT WORK
you get time off for good behavior. you get rewarded for good behavior with more WORK.

 

IN PRISON AT WORK
a guard locks and unlocks the doors for you .. you must carry around a security card and unlock open all the doors yourself .

 

IN PRISON AT WORK
you can watch TV and play games. you get fired for watching TV and playing games.
IN PRISON 
they allow your family and
friends to visit.
AT WORK 
you can not even speak to your family and friends.
IN PRISON AT WORK
all expenses are paid by taxpayers with no work at all. You get to pay all the expenses to go to work and then they deduct taxes from your salary to pay for the prisoners.
Humm?

Which Sounds Better?

So what are you waiting for………???

Kill your Boss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDIAN ECONOMY -FOOL’S PARADISE


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With Amartya Sen, Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Man Mohan Singh, P Chidambaram all at the helm, Indian Government is literally living in fools Paradise

Indian economy comes to a fullstop
 MR Venkatesh
A fairly large South-Indian group with varied business interests had invited me to a strategy session to turn it around. It was the first meeting and was to be preceded by breakfast. As we waited to be served, I perused their latest balance sheet.
 


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Human Relations Development


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May be it is a Lesson for those who Live in a Fools paradise. 

————————————–TODAY’S RELATIONSHIPS
By
Saman

I was right about the turban again! The Sardar sitting next to me was most definitely a fauji! Not for me the Montek Singh turban or the yuppee turbans worn by Vancouver Sardars. No Siree!
The turban standard that I subscribed to was the one and only Bajwa standards. I being a southie and a fauji, Bajwa had, years ago, initiated me into the art of turban wearing. Having helped him set up his turbans on many occasions, sometimes when our ship was rolling and pitching like hell, I was almost a connoisseur on turbans! Also, my vanity prevented me from appreciating any other way a turban is worn.
This was Bajwa Standards, well almost.

‘Hi’, says the Sardar, red turban, red fifty, about sixty years of age, or so I think.

‘Hello’- me

‘I am Vikram Singh’ – Sardar

Now this is where I typically stop. I don’t like too much conversation on flights. I am the quiet, reading, sleeping type. I generally mumble something and pretend to look at a magazine. But this was a fauji after all! This long business class flight from JFK to Dubai could turn out different.

Me-‘Samani, 48 NDA (just on a whim!)’
Well, well, well’ says the Sardar, ‘I am from the 22nd course’-Spot on Samani!  And the flight starts!

After an unusual bumpy take off, we all get settled down. When the hostess asks for a drink, I choose my usual Jim Beam , soda hoping that the Sardar will also have a drink. But he is different. He chooses orange juice. My first thoughts were ‘This one has turned religious!’ ‘So what do you do in the US?’ asks the Sardar, if just to start a conversation

‘Came for a Board meet’ – me

‘ I came on a holiday to the US’ says the Sardar, looking at me from the corner of his eyes, weighing me. I could almost hear his thoughts. This guy should address me as ‘sir’ is what he is thinking !

Good to hear that Sir!’-me.

After leaving the navy 14 years ago, I don’t like to call any one ‘sir’ and also do not like to be called ‘sir’ by any one. But 22nd course is miles senior! After that it is a pretty much one sided conversation, with him talking and I listening.

What a story this turns out to be! ‘ Had an excellent twenty two years in the Army, with Command appointments and the occasional tiff with the bosses initially’ starts the Sardar. ‘ Tiffs got more frequent as I went up in service’. ‘Got married like anyone else, two kids, both sons’ . ‘Left the army as it was strangling me. Couldn’t stand the hierarchy and especially those bureaucrats in Delhi’ ‘liked my old monk soda-too much of it in fact’-Sardar giving me his life story in tweets!

‘Started a small textile business based in Ludhiana initially’ continues the Sardar.’ Slowly grew and established my business first in Delhi and then in Mumbai’. ‘That’s when tragedy stuck’ says he, hoping that I would break my silence at least now.

‘What happened sir’ I dutifully ask, getting slightly muzzled with my second Jim Beam. I might as well confess, I am a two Jim Beam (small) man. Anything more than that, I get high and go to sleep.

‘Well the wife dies on me suddenly’ says the Sardar fully accusing her as if it was her fault.‘So sorry to hear that sir’ I mumble.
‘Blood cancer they said. One minute she was there and another minute she was gone’ continues the Sardar. ‘Tried to give her the best medical attention-no luck’. ‘Worst part was that she was the bridge between me andmy sons or their wives’. ‘You know with these field appointments, you hardly know your sons, especially when they grow up’. ‘Worse still when they get married’. ‘’Their wives were so, well, different’. ‘I think I have two grand sons and three grand daughters’ . ‘Or is it the other way around?’ ‘Not sure’ says the Sardar almost asking me to help him remember.‘But the business went on extremely well’ he continues.

‘Bought a large plot near Gurgaon’ and built a three story house’. ‘Ground floor for me, first floor for the elder son ‘s family and top floor for the younger son’s family’. Elder son to look after the business in Delhi and younger one  for Mumbai. I retained overall control and also business expansion into other metros. 33 crores  turn over in four years, can you believe that?’ asks the Sardar
‘Wife died in the ground floor. At least she could take part a bit in my success’.  ‘Three cars’. Bought the second Sonata in whole of Delhi, would you believe this?’ he continues. Having stayed in Dubai for long, I know for a fact that Hyundai Sonata is a lousy car but I let him bask in his glory. “That was great Sir, I mumbled’   ‘Yes, Sonata for me, Esteem for my sons’ says the Sardar and the meal arrives. I see the Sardar having Asian Jain Vegetarian meal. “This is surely going to end religious ‘ I think ‘See how life changes’ the sardar asks philosophically between mouths full of yucky pasty main course.

‘This happens one day, after my wife’s death, when I was about sixty one years old’ he says

‘My elder daughter in law comes to me and says, “Papa why don’t you spend more time with the grand kids?”

‘Now this is the first time she has spoken to me in months’ continues the Sardar, ‘I thought she was being extremely nice and cares about me’   ‘Sure Beta, what do you want me to do?’ I asked.

‘Why don’t you drop them to school daily in the Sonata?’ says Rupali, ‘well that’s her name’

‘Sure Beta’ I say, wholeheartedly thinking that I should spend more time with the grandkids;  especially since I did not spend time with my kids

‘This routine starts and actually I started enjoying  it myself. The kids like the Sonata. Well they were spoiling it a bit but that was OK’

‘After a few months’ continues the Sardar, it was the younger daughter in law’s turn. She comes and asks ‘Papa, can you get us some grocery?’

‘What do you need Beta’ I ask and she gives me a long list. ‘So I dutifully get it, using my credit card for god’s sake!’

This goes on for a while and slowly but steadily I start doing a lot of house hold work. Of course we had maids etc but I am soon helping with kids’ homework.

On my sixty third birthday, my younger son comes to me and says ’ papa, I have a surprise gift for you!’. He takes me outside and shows me a brand new Alto all 800 cc of it. Couldn’t make out whether it is a second hand car. I mumbled ‘thanks’

‘Suddenly from next day, the driver drops me and the kids to school in the Alto. Elder son has gone on a visit to his in laws in the Sonata.
I still did not feel anything amiss’. The sardar stops to see if I am listening or have I dozed off. He doesn’t know that I am all ears now and in fact my heart is palpitating.

Then one day during holi, we have a family dinner. Now this is one tradition which the wife has established, god bless her soul. Come hell or high water, holi dinner was taboo. That’s when I make an announcement

“Beta logon, I have a surprise gift for you!”
“What’s it papa, asks the elder son’
‘I have arranged a family holiday for all you for 45 days to the US during the summer!’. ‘I think you all looked after me so well that I felt you needed the break’ “all business class, five star stay in both west and east coast’

‘But papa, how about the business?’-younger son

‘All taken care of. Shyam Gupta ( our manager for a long time) and I will handle this in your absence. As such business is dull during summer and I so want you to go and enjoy!’.

“The wives were pleased whilst the sons, I was not so sure’. “Grand kids yell-whoopie’

‘That was a great gesture’ I say, munching a sandwich

‘But what was greater was yet to come’ says the sardar. ‘Just like the appreciation exercises we did in staff college, I had’ appreciated the situation and situated the appreciation’ he continues, the only hint of humour during our entire conversation during the long flight.

Then comes a burst of gunfire from the Sardar

Just after Holi

1. I place an ad in the Times of India Matrimony asking for a soul mate

2. I place another ad for selling my house

3. Yet another ad for selling my business
4. last ad for selling my cars, except the Sonata
‘When the family duly went on the holiday, I sold the house, my business and cars. And do you know, also found a soul mate in a Bengali professor, teaching in JNU!’. I shifted to DSOI and here I am back from my holiday! My wife had some business in New York and she is coming back after a week. She doesn’t like meat eaters or drinkers and that’s why I decided to give up both.

In the bargain my weight has come down and my medical test reports have all come to near normal.

‘A success story wouldn’t you say?’ asks the Sardar when the flight is about to land in Dubai. ’ And you know what, ‘ he continues,’ when I land in Delhi, the Sonata will pick me up to take me to DSOI!’

I am not a hugging person. But this was one occasion I almost got up,
(screw the seat belt sign) and hugged the man!




— 
With best wishes

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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INDIAN ECONOMY FOOLS PARADISE


 

With Amartya Sen, Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Man Mohan Singh, P Chidambaram all at the helm, Indian Government is literally living in fools Paradise

 

Indian economy comes to a fullstop
 MR Venkatesh

A fairly large South-Indian group with varied business interests had invited me to a strategy session to turn it around. It was the first meeting and was to be preceded by breakfast. As we waited to be served, I perused their latest balance sheet.

 

TALE OF TWO DEMOCRACIES


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  True Democracy in Action

                                                   JOGISHWAR SINGH 

As a Swiss citizen born in India, I am many times brought to think about my 
experiences of the democratic systems prevalent in the two countries.

Before Indian ‘patriots’ start screaming murder at what I am going to say, I 

should point out that I am fully aware that I am talking about two different 
historical realities.

Switzerland has been independent for over 800 years while India is a newly 

created entity, now a mere 66 years old.

Switzerland has a population of only 8 million while India has the second 

highest population of any country in the world at over 1.2 billion (give or 
take a few million). And expected, in the near future, to even outstrip 
China, and become the world’s most populous. 

The trigger for this set of reflections was what I saw on the 7.30 pm eve. 
news on Swiss TV a couple of weeks ago.
The Swiss President, Mr Ueli Maurer,  
was leaving on a five day state visit to 
China. The news showed him arriving  at Zürich airport in an ordinary private 
vehicle. The President got out of the  car by opening the car door himself. 
He walked to the nearby baggage trolley stand outside the airport entrance. 
He took a baggage trolley out, rolled it  towards the car, lifted his suitcase and 
travel bag himself, put these on the trolley which he then rolled towards the 
entrance like any passenger lambda like you or me. He walked up to the check 
in counter with just two other persons  walking behind him. He checked his 
luggage in for a commercial flight without  any special treatment being meted 
out to him.

For any Indians (or others) who might  
find it difficult to believe what I have 
described above, you can CLICK on  the link provided hereunder, at the 
end of this article, to view a TV news  clip from the evening prime time 
news for July 16, 2013..

This clip is really worth watching.
Conditioned by my personal experiences of dealing with politicians and 
government ministers in India while serving as an IAS (Indian Administrative 
Service) officer, I was so struck by the contrast between what I had experienced 
in India and what I was seeing on the TV screen that I told my wife that this 
represented one of the finest examples of democracy for me, certainly of the 
Swiss variety. It made me proud to be the citizen of a country where the serving 
President behaves like an ordinary citizen and does not feel the need to consider  
special privileged treatment as his divine birthright. 
I remembered the countless times when I had seen the fury of Indian politicians, 
much below the level of the President of a country, at what they considered as 
a slight because they had not been treated as demi-gods.
I am not a psychologist. I do not know whether centuries of slavery have 
generated this distorted VIP culture in India but I remember that we all did curse 
the politicians there for causing so much inconvenience to the general public 
by expecting, demanding and getting privileged treatment. 
Who in India, except maybe some politicians or bureaucrats, has not been 
inconvenienced by VIP visits for which miles of roads and highways, even entire neighbourhoods, are blocked off to traffic, and flights are delayed, awaiting the 
arrival of some VIP or even his/her flunkies/family members? 
Any such inconvenience would cause an uproar in Switzerland
In India, it does not generate even a whimper.
In this context, an incident from the not very distant past strongly lingers in my 
memory. A few years ago, a former IAS batch-mate of mine (1976 batch) had 
visited Switzerland. 
I have noticed that Switzerland becomes a prize destination of choice for a lot 
of Indian ministers and bureaucrats during their hot summer for attending all 
kinds of useless conferences which are essentially talking shops organised 
by the United Nations, an organisation which is a hotbed of nepotism and 
inefficiency.
This IAS officer wanted to see Switzerland, so I acted as his local tourist 
guide. 
While we were going around the Swiss federal capital, Bern, it was lunch 
time so we decided to have lunch at a restaurant very close to the Swiss 
parliament building. 
As we took our seats at a table, a Swiss gentleman sitting at the next table, 
reading his newspaper while sipping his coffee, greeted us in English. 
While we ordered our meal and waited, he finished reading his newspaper, 
drank his coffee and called for his bill which he paid before leaving. While 
going out, he again politely wished us goodbye, even saying, “I hope you 
enjoy your stay in Switzerland” in English.
After he had left, I asked my visitor if he knew who the man had been. 
Obviously, my visitor did not know the answer. I informed him that we had 
just been greeted by the then serving Swiss President, Mr René Felber. 

My guest thought I was making fun of him. He would not believe me so I 
called the restaurant manager to confirm the veracity of what I had told him. 
The manager duly confirmed what I had said. 
My Indian visitor was flabbergasted. He said, “How can this be possible? 
He actually paid his bill before leaving”. 

So, what struck my visitor the most had been the fact that a VIP had 

actually paid his bill! I wonder what he would say if he saw our current 
President, Mr Ueli Maurer, personally loading his bags on to a baggage 
trolley and wheeling it to a check-in counter just like any ordinary citizen. 
His disbelief could only be countered by visual evidence on the TV!
My visitor’s reaction brought back memories of when, as a serving sub-
divisional or district level official, I had been called upon to organise lunches 
and dinners for numerous collections of freeloaders travelling with ministers 
or bureaucrats in India. 
I seldom remember any politician or bureaucrat actually paying or even 
offering to pay for the bonanza laid out for them. Those who did offer to pay, 
did so at the ridiculously low official daily fare of eleven rupees (today, a 
mere 20 cents US) per person or something like that. 
Nobody ever asked how it had been possible to lay out a lavish meal 
comprising several dishes, accompanied by expensive alcoholic beverages, 
for such a petty sum. I never found out myself who used to pay for all this 
extravaganza at the end of the line. 
Like a good Indian bureaucrat, I just used to pass the buck down the line to 
my junior magistrates and revenue officials. To this day, I am unable to clarify 
which poor victim — read, citizen! — who got stuck with paying for all the 
freebies on offer.
While working as chief of staff to the President of the Swiss Commission for 
the Presence of Switzerland in Foreign Countries many years ago, I had the 
chance of accompanying him to Strasbourg for meetings of the Council of 
Europe. I also had the privilege of close interaction with several Swiss 
members of parliament over an extended period of 12 to 14 months. 
The contrast to the behavioural pattern of what I had experienced in India 
with politicians was so stark that it has stayed seared in my mind even 
till today. 
I am by no means suggesting that Swiss politicians are angels, but the 
kind of behaviour that Indian politicians or bureaucrats get away with as 
a matter of routine in India would torpedo their careers in Switzerland 
in a jiffy.
Each such incident deepens my gratitude to Waheguru Almighty for having 
made me settle down in a country like Switzerland where the President 
carries his own bags to the check-in counter. 
Where no roads are blocked for hours so that some VIP can, in the name 
of security, be whisked around in convoys of official vehicles. 
Where politicians and bureaucrats pay their bills in restaurants. 
Where grossly sycophantic behaviour is not the general and accepted 
norm. 
Where no red-light beacons or screaming sirens signal the passage of 
VIP vehicles. Indeed, the red-light-beacon culture of officialdom in India 
merits a full story in itself.

I might accept India as a true democracy the day I see its President or 

Prime Minister behaving like the Swiss President before his departure 
on an official visit abroad.
I don’t think I will ever see such a sight in India during my lifetime. 
You think, maybe, my grandchildren will?
 
To view the TV news-clip, please CLICK here.
 
August 15, 2013
———————–
 

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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HRD Human Relations Development


May be it is a Lesson for those who Live in a Fools paradise.

————————————–
TODAY’S RELATIONSHIPS
By
Saman

I was right about the turban again! The Sardar sitting next to me was most definitely a fauji! Not for me the Montek Singh turban or the yuppee turbans worn by Vancouver Sardars. No Siree!

The turban standard that I subscribed to was the one and only Bajwa standards. I being a southie and a fauji, Bajwa had, years ago, initiated me into the art of turban wearing. Having helped him set up his turbans on many occasions, sometimes when our ship was rolling and pitching like hell, I was almost a connoisseur on turbans! Also, my vanity prevented me from appreciating any other way a turban is worn.
This was Bajwa Standards, well almost.

‘Hi’, says the Sardar, red turban, red fifty, about sixty years of age, or so I think.

‘Hello’- me

‘I am Vikram Singh’ – Sardar

Now this is where I typically stop. I don’t like too much conversation on flights. I am the quiet, reading, sleeping type. I generally mumble something and pretend to look at a magazine. But this was a fauji after all! This long business class flight from JFK to Dubai could turn out different.

Me-‘Samani, 48 NDA (just on a whim!)’

Well, well, well’ says the Sardar, ‘I am from the 22nd course’-Spot on Samani!  And the flight starts!

After an unusual bumpy take off, we all get settled down. When the hostess asks for a drink, I choose my usual Jim Beam , soda hoping that the Sardar will also have a drink. But he is different. He chooses orange juice. My first thoughts were ‘This one has turned religious!’ ‘So what do you do in the US?’ asks the Sardar, if just to start a conversation

‘Came for a Board meet’ – me

‘ I came on a holiday to the US’ says the Sardar, looking at me from the corner of his eyes, weighing me. I could almost hear his thoughts. This guy should address me as ‘sir’ is what he is thinking !

Good to hear that Sir!’-me.

After leaving the navy 14 years ago, I don’t like to call any one ‘sir’ and also do not like to be called ‘sir’ by any one. But 22nd course is miles senior! After that it is a pretty much one sided conversation, with him talking and I listening.

What a story this turns out to be! ‘ Had an excellent twenty two years in the Army, with Command appointments and the occasional tiff with the bosses initially’ starts the Sardar. ‘ Tiffs got more frequent as I went up in service’. ‘Got married like anyone else, two kids, both sons’ . ‘Left the army as it was strangling me. Couldn’t stand the hierarchy and especially those bureaucrats in Delhi’ ‘liked my old monk soda-too much of it in fact’-Sardar giving me his life story in tweets!

‘Started a small textile business based in Ludhiana initially’ continues the Sardar.’ Slowly grew and established my business first in Delhi and then in Mumbai’. ‘That’s when tragedy stuck’ says he, hoping that I would break my silence at least now.

‘What happened sir’ I dutifully ask, getting slightly muzzled with my second Jim Beam. I might as well confess, I am a two Jim Beam (small) man. Anything more than that, I get high and go to sleep.

‘Well the wife dies on me suddenly’ says the Sardar fully accusing her as if it was her fault.‘So sorry to hear that sir’ I mumble.

‘Blood cancer they said. One minute she was there and another minute she was gone’ continues the Sardar. ‘Tried to give her the best medical attention-no luck’. ‘Worst part was that she was the bridge between me andmy sons or their wives’. ‘You know with these field appointments, you hardly know your sons, especially when they grow up’. ‘Worse still when they get married’. ‘’Their wives were so, well, different’. ‘I think I have two grand sons and three grand daughters’ . ‘Or is it the other way around?’ ‘Not sure’ says the Sardar almost asking me to help him remember.‘But the business went on extremely well’ he continues.

‘Bought a large plot near Gurgaon’ and built a three story house’. ‘Ground floor for me, first floor for the elder son ‘s family and top floor for the younger son’s family’. Elder son to look after the business in Delhi and younger one  for Mumbai. I retained overall control and also business expansion into other metros. 33 crores  turn over in four years, can you believe that?’ asks the Sardar

‘Wife died in the ground floor. At least she could take part a bit in my success’.  ‘Three cars’. Bought the second Sonata in whole of Delhi, would you believe this?’ he continues. Having stayed in Dubai for long, I know for a fact that Hyundai Sonata is a lousy car but I let him bask in his glory. “That was great Sir, I mumbled’   ‘Yes, Sonata for me, Esteem for my sons’ says the Sardar and the meal arrives. I see the Sardar having Asian Jain Vegetarian meal. “This is surely going to end religious ‘ I think ‘See how life changes’ the sardar asks philosophically between mouths full of yucky pasty main course.

‘This happens one day, after my wife’s death, when I was about sixty one years old’ he says

‘My elder daughter in law comes to me and says, “Papa why don’t you spend more time with the grand kids?”

‘Now this is the first time she has spoken to me in months’ continues the Sardar, ‘I thought she was being extremely nice and cares about me’   ‘Sure Beta, what do you want me to do?’ I asked.

‘Why don’t you drop them to school daily in the Sonata?’ says Rupali, ‘well that’s her name’

‘Sure Beta’ I say, wholeheartedly thinking that I should spend more time with the grandkids;  especially since I did not spend time with my kids

‘This routine starts and actually I started enjoying  it myself. The kids like the Sonata. Well they were spoiling it a bit but that was OK’

‘After a few months’ continues the Sardar, it was the younger daughter in law’s turn. She comes and asks ‘Papa, can you get us some grocery?’

‘What do you need Beta’ I ask and she gives me a long list. ‘So I dutifully get it, using my credit card for god’s sake!’

This goes on for a while and slowly but steadily I start doing a lot of house hold work. Of course we had maids etc but I am soon helping with kids’ homework.

On my sixty third birthday, my younger son comes to me and says ’ papa, I have a surprise gift for you!’. He takes me outside and shows me a brand new Alto all 800 cc of it. Couldn’t make out whether it is a second hand car. I mumbled ‘thanks’

‘Suddenly from next day, the driver drops me and the kids to school in the Alto. Elder son has gone on a visit to his in laws in the Sonata.

I still did not feel anything amiss’. The sardar stops to see if I am listening or have I dozed off. He doesn’t know that I am all ears now and in fact my heart is palpitating.

Then one day during holi, we have a family dinner. Now this is one tradition which the wife has established, god bless her soul. Come hell or high water, holi dinner was taboo. That’s when I make an announcement

“Beta logon, I have a surprise gift for you!”

“What’s it papa, asks the elder son’

‘I have arranged a family holiday for all you for 45 days to the US during the summer!’. ‘I think you all looked after me so well that I felt you needed the break’ “all business class, five star stay in both west and east coast’

‘But papa, how about the business?’-younger son

‘All taken care of. Shyam Gupta ( our manager for a long time) and I will handle this in your absence. As such business is dull during summer and I so want you to go and enjoy!’.

“The wives were pleased whilst the sons, I was not so sure’. “Grand kids yell-whoopie’

‘That was a great gesture’ I say, munching a sandwich

‘But what was greater was yet to come’ says the sardar. ‘Just like the appreciation exercises we did in staff college, I had’ appreciated the situation and situated the appreciation’ he continues, the only hint of humour during our entire conversation during the long flight.

Then comes a burst of gunfire from the Sardar

Just after Holi

1. I place an ad in the Times of India Matrimony asking for a soul mate

2. I place another ad for selling my house

3. Yet another ad for selling my business

4. last ad for selling my cars, except the Sonata

‘When the family duly went on the holiday, I sold the house, my business and cars. And do you know, also found a soul mate in a Bengali professor, teaching in JNU!’. I shifted to DSOI and here I am back from my holiday! My wife had some business in New York and she is coming back after a week. She doesn’t like meat eaters or drinkers and that’s why I decided to give up both.

In the bargain my weight has come down and my medical test reports have all come to near normal.

‘A success story wouldn’t you say?’ asks the Sardar when the flight is about to land in Dubai. ’ And you know what, ‘ he continues,’ when I land in Delhi, the Sonata will pick me up to take me to DSOI!’

I am not a hugging person. But this was one occasion I almost got up,
(screw the seat belt sign) and hugged the man!


With best wishes

 

Tale of two Democracies


  True Democracy in Action

                                                   JOGISHWAR SINGH

As a Swiss citizen born in India, I am many times brought to think about my 
experiences of the democratic systems prevalent in the two countries.

Before Indian ‘patriots’ start screaming murder at what I am going to say, I 

should point out that I am fully aware that I am talking about two different 
historical realities.

Switzerland has been independent for over 800 years while India is a newly 

created entity, now a mere 66 years old.

Switzerland has a population of only 8 million while India has the second 

highest population of any country in the world at over 1.2 billion (give or 
take a few million). And expected, in the near future, to even outstrip 
China, and become the world’s most populous. 

The trigger for this set of reflections was what I saw on the 7.30 pm eve. 
news on Swiss TV a couple of weeks ago.

The Swiss President, Mr Ueli Maurer,  was leaving on a five day state visit to 

China. The news showed him arriving  at Zürich airport in an ordinary private 
vehicle. The President got out of the  car by opening the car door himself. 
He walked to the nearby baggage trolley stand outside the airport entrance. 
He took a baggage trolley out, rolled it  towards the car, lifted his suitcase and 
travel bag himself, put these on the trolley which he then rolled towards the 
entrance like any passenger lambda like you or me. He walked up to the check 
in counter with just two other persons  walking behind him. He checked his 
luggage in for a commercial flight without  any special treatment being meted 
out to him.

For any Indians (or others) who might  find it difficult to believe what I have 
described above, you can CLICK on  the link provided hereunder, at the 
end of this article, to view a TV news  clip from the evening prime time 
news for July 16, 2013..

This clip is really worth watching.

Conditioned by my personal experiences of dealing with politicians and 

government ministers in India while serving as an IAS (Indian Administrative
Service) officer, I was so struck by the contrast between what I had experienced
in India and what I was seeing on the TV screen that I told my wife that this
represented one of the finest examples of democracy for me, certainly of the
Swiss variety. It made me proud to be the citizen of a country where the serving
President behaves like an ordinary citizen and does not feel the need to consider
special privileged treatment as his divine birthright. 

I remembered the countless times when I had seen the fury of Indian politicians, 

much below the level of the President of a country, at what they considered as
a slight because they had not been treated as demi-gods.

I am not a psychologist. I do not know whether centuries of slavery have 

generated this distorted VIP culture in India but I remember that we all did curse
the politicians there for causing so much inconvenience to the general public
by expecting, demanding and getting privileged treatment. 

Who in India, except maybe some politicians or bureaucrats, has not been 

inconvenienced by VIP visits for which miles of roads and highways, even entire neighbourhoods, are blocked off to traffic, and flights are delayed, awaiting the 
arrival of some VIP or even his/her flunkies/family members? 

Any such inconvenience would cause an uproar in Switzerland

In India, it does not generate even a whimper.

In this context, an incident from the not very distant past strongly lingers in my 

memory. A few years ago, a former IAS batch-mate of mine (1976 batch) had
visited Switzerland. 

I have noticed that Switzerland becomes a prize destination of choice for a lot 

of Indian ministers and bureaucrats during their hot summer for attending all
kinds of useless conferences which are essentially talking shops organised
by the United Nations, an organisation which is a hotbed of nepotism and
inefficiency.

This IAS officer wanted to see Switzerland, so I acted as his local tourist 

guide. 

While we were going around the Swiss federal capital, Bern, it was lunch 

time so we decided to have lunch at a restaurant very close to the Swiss
parliament building. 

As we took our seats at a table, a Swiss gentleman sitting at the next table, 

reading his newspaper while sipping his coffee, greeted us in English.
While we ordered our meal and waited, he finished reading his newspaper,
drank his coffee and called for his bill which he paid before leaving. While
going out, he again politely wished us goodbye, even saying, “I hope you
enjoy your stay in Switzerland” in English.

After he had left, I asked my visitor if he knew who the man had been. 

Obviously, my visitor did not know the answer. I informed him that we had 
just been greeted by the then serving Swiss President, Mr René Felber. 

My guest thought I was making fun of him. He would not believe me so I 
called the restaurant manager to confirm the veracity of what I had told him.
The manager duly confirmed what I had said. 

My Indian visitor was flabbergasted. He said, “How can this be possible? 

He actually paid his bill before leaving”. 

So, what struck my visitor the most had been the fact that a VIP had 

actually paid his bill! I wonder what he would say if he saw our current
President, Mr Ueli Maurer, personally loading his bags on to a baggage
trolley and wheeling it to a check-in counter just like any ordinary citizen.
His disbelief could only be countered by visual evidence on the TV!

My visitor’s reaction brought back memories of when, as a serving sub-

divisional or district level official, I had been called upon to organise lunches
and dinners for numerous collections of freeloaders travelling with ministers
or bureaucrats in India. 

I seldom remember any politician or bureaucrat actually paying or even 

offering to pay for the bonanza laid out for them. Those who did offer to pay, 
did so at the ridiculously low official daily fare of eleven rupees (today, a
mere 20 cents US) per person or something like that. 

Nobody ever asked how it had been possible to lay out a lavish meal 

comprising several dishes, accompanied by expensive alcoholic beverages,
for such a petty sum. I never found out myself who used to pay for all this
extravaganza at the end of the line. 

Like a good Indian bureaucrat, I just used to pass the buck down the line to 

my junior magistrates and revenue officials. To this day, I am unable to clarify
which poor victim — read, citizen! — who got stuck with paying for all the
freebies on offer.

While working as chief of staff to the President of the Swiss Commission for 

the Presence of Switzerland in Foreign Countries many years ago, I had the
chance of accompanying him to Strasbourg for meetings of the Council of
Europe. I also had the privilege of close interaction with several Swiss
members of parliament over an extended period of 12 to 14 months. 

The contrast to the behavioural pattern of what I had experienced in India 

with politicians was so stark that it has stayed seared in my mind even 
till today. 

I am by no means suggesting that Swiss politicians are angels, but the 

kind of behaviour that Indian politicians or bureaucrats get away with as
a matter of routine in India would torpedo their careers in Switzerland
in a jiffy.

Each such incident deepens my gratitude to Waheguru Almighty for having 

made me settle down in a country like Switzerland where the President
carries his own bags to the check-in counter. 

Where no roads are blocked for hours so that some VIP can, in the name 

of security, be whisked around in convoys of official vehicles. 

Where politicians and bureaucrats pay their bills in restaurants. 

Where grossly sycophantic behaviour is not the general and accepted 

norm. 

Where no red-light beacons or screaming sirens signal the passage of 

VIP vehicles. Indeed, the red-light-beacon culture of officialdom in India
merits a full story in itself.

I might accept India as a true democracy the day I see its President or 

Prime Minister behaving like the Swiss President before his departure
on an official visit abroad.

I don’t think I will ever see such a sight in India during my lifetime. 

You think, maybe, my grandchildren will?

To view the TV news-clip, please CLICK here.
August 15, 2013
———————–

 

Sacred herb turmeric may make at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs utterly obsolete


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Sacred herb turmeric may make at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs utterly obsolete

(NaturalNews) You may have already heard about the many amazing healing properties of the spice turmeric, which is also sometimes referred to as curcumin. But did you know that literally thousands of published, peer-reviewed studies conducted and compiled over the years lend credence to the notion that turmeric works the same as, or even better than, at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs currently on the market?

It is true, and thanks to the diligent work of GreenMedInfo.com‘s Sayer Ji in compiling this valuable information, it is now available publicly for the benefit of your and your family’s health. Many of the most commonly prevalent chronic illnesses, it turns out, can be prevented, treated, and even cured using turmeric, so you will want to pay attention. Here are seven drugs and classes of drugs that science shows can be effectively replaced with turmeric:

1) Statin drugs for cholesterol. Popular cholesterol drugs like Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium) and Crestor (rosuvastatin) are completely unnecessary when taking standardized doses of curcuminoids extracted from turmeric, according to a 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R D. Researchers found that in patients with endothelial dysfunction, the underlying blood vessel pathology that leads to atherosclerosis, turmeric extract worked at least as good as the drugs at reducing inflammation and relieving oxidative stress in type 2 diabetics.

2) Corticosteroid drugs. Millions of people receive steroid injections every year to treat the inflammation associated with conditions like arthritis and even cancer. But a 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that turmeric’s primary antioxidant, curcumin, works just as well as steroid medications in the treatment of inflammatory eye disease. Several studies released in the years following found similar benefits for other inflammatory diseases commonly treated with steroids.

3) Antidepressants. Besides their copious side effects, antidepressant drugs like Prozac (fluoxetine) and Paxil (paroxetine) are extremely risky, as they can actually make depression symptoms worse for some people. But why even bother to use them when turmeric has been shown to effectively reduce depressive behavior the same or even better than these dangerous drugs?

4) Blood thinners. People at high risk of heart attack or stroke, or who require blood-thinning drugs to avoid these and other cardiovascular events, may simply be able to take turmeric instead. This suggestion is based on a 1986 study published in the journal Arzneimittelforschung, which found that curcumin has similar anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects as aspirin, the blood-thinning drug of choice for many conventional doctors.

5) Anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin is also commonly prescribed for other inflammatory conditions, as is ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and a number of other pain pills. But these may be unnecessary as turmeric was shown in a 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene to exert similar anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activity, particularly against cancer cells, as these drugs.

6) Chemotherapy drugs. The cancer industry would have us all believe that chemotherapy drugs are one of the few methods we have at our disposal to treat cancer. But a 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer found that curcumin works just as well as oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at treating colorectal cancer.

7) Diabetes drugs. Not only is turmeric a viable contender in treating diabetes, a 2009 study published in the journalBiochemistry and Biophysical Research Community found that it works up to 100,000 times better than the popular diabetes drug Metformin at increasing glucose uptake. Turmeric also helps suppress glucose production in the liver at least as well as the most popular diabetes drugs on the market today.

Beyond this, turmeric is a powerful cancer-fighting herb as well, which Ji expounds upon further in his turmeric review. Be sure to check it out at:http://www.greenmedinfo.com


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Sacred herb turmeric may make at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs utterly obsolete


Sacred herb turmeric may make at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs utterly obsolete

(NaturalNews) You may have already heard about the many amazing healing properties of the spice turmeric, which is also sometimes referred to as curcumin. But did you know that literally thousands of published, peer-reviewed studies conducted and compiled over the years lend credence to the notion that turmeric works the same as, or even better than, at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs currently on the market?

It is true, and thanks to the diligent work of GreenMedInfo.com‘s Sayer Ji in compiling this valuable information, it is now available publicly for the benefit of your and your family’s health. Many of the most commonly prevalent chronic illnesses, it turns out, can be prevented, treated, and even cured using turmeric, so you will want to pay attention. Here are seven drugs and classes of drugs that science shows can be effectively replaced with turmeric:

1) Statin drugs for cholesterol. Popular cholesterol drugs like Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium) and Crestor (rosuvastatin) are completely unnecessary when taking standardized doses of curcuminoids extracted from turmeric, according to a 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R D. Researchers found that in patients with endothelial dysfunction, the underlying blood vessel pathology that leads to atherosclerosis, turmeric extract worked at least as good as the drugs at reducing inflammation and relieving oxidative stress in type 2 diabetics.

2) Corticosteroid drugs. Millions of people receive steroid injections every year to treat the inflammation associated with conditions like arthritis and even cancer. But a 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that turmeric’s primary antioxidant, curcumin, works just as well as steroid medications in the treatment of inflammatory eye disease. Several studies released in the years following found similar benefits for other inflammatory diseases commonly treated with steroids.

3) Antidepressants. Besides their copious side effects, antidepressant drugs like Prozac (fluoxetine) and Paxil (paroxetine) are extremely risky, as they can actually make depression symptoms worse for some people. But why even bother to use them when turmeric has been shown to effectively reduce depressive behavior the same or even better than these dangerous drugs?

4) Blood thinners. People at high risk of heart attack or stroke, or who require blood-thinning drugs to avoid these and other cardiovascular events, may simply be able to take turmeric instead. This suggestion is based on a 1986 study published in the journal Arzneimittelforschung, which found that curcumin has similar anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects as aspirin, the blood-thinning drug of choice for many conventional doctors.

5) Anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin is also commonly prescribed for other inflammatory conditions, as is ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and a number of other pain pills. But these may be unnecessary as turmeric was shown in a 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene to exert similar anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activity, particularly against cancer cells, as these drugs.

6) Chemotherapy drugs. The cancer industry would have us all believe that chemotherapy drugs are one of the few methods we have at our disposal to treat cancer. But a 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer found that curcumin works just as well as oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at treating colorectal cancer.

7) Diabetes drugs. Not only is turmeric a viable contender in treating diabetes, a 2009 study published in the journalBiochemistry and Biophysical Research Community found that it works up to 100,000 times better than the popular diabetes drug Metformin at increasing glucose uptake. Turmeric also helps suppress glucose production in the liver at least as well as the most popular diabetes drugs on the market today.

Beyond this, turmeric is a powerful cancer-fighting herb as well, which Ji expounds upon further in his turmeric review. Be sure to check it out at:
http://www.greenmedinfo.com