एक जहाज में 1155 करोड रूपए का सोना चांदी था तो आप सोच सकते है कि अंग्रेज राबर्ट क्लाईव तो 700 जहाज सोने चांदी के भर के ब्रिटेन ले गया था अंग्रेजी गुलामी के दौर में,


 

1941 में डूबे ब्रिटिश जहाज से चांदी का खजाना मिला, कोलकाता से ब्रिटेन जा रहा था

लंदन, एजेंसी : अमेरिका की एक अन्वेषण कंपनी ने डूबे हुए एक ब्रिटिश जहाज से भारी मात्रा में चांदी का खजाना बरामद किया है, जिसकी अंतरराष्ट्रीय बाजार में कीमत 15 करोड़ पाउंड (करीब 1155 करोड़ रुपये) हो सकती है। यह जहाज कोलकाता से लंदन की यात्रा पर रवाना हुआ था लेकिन अटलांटिक में 1941 में एक जर्मन यू बोट ने इसे डुबो दिया था।

परिवहन विभाग के अनुसार अन्वेषण कंपनी ओडिसी मैरिन इस माल का 80 फीसदी हिस्सा रखेगी। परिवहन विभाग ने कंपनी को डूबे विशालकाय जहाज के मलबे की खोज की जिम्मेदारी सौंपी थी। एसएस गैरसोप्पा नामक यह जहाज दिसंबर 1940 में कोलकाता से रवाना हुआ था और इस पर 240 टन चांदी, लोहा और चाय लदी थी। यह पोत ब्रिटिश स्टीम नेवीगेशन कंपनी से ताल्लुक रखता था।

यह जहाज लिवरपूल जाने वाला था लेकिन मजबूरन इसे अपने सैन्य काफिले से अलग होकर अपना रास्ता बदलना पड़ा था। चूंकि आयरलैंड के पास मौसम बहुत खराब हो गया था और इस जहाज में ईंधन भी बहुत कम बचा था। जब यह जहाज एक छोटा रास्ता अपनाकर आयरिश हार्बर के दक्षिण-पश्चिम में पहुंचा तो 17 फरवरी 1941 को जर्मन पनडुब्बी यू101 ने इस पर हमला कर दिया। एक ही तारपीडो में यह जहाज डूब गया।

इस हमले में जहाज में मौजूद 85 चालक दल मारे गए। जहाज में बस एक ही व्यक्ति जीवित बचा था। इस विशालकाय 412 फीट ऊंचे जहाज का मलबा हाल ही में आयरिश तट से 300 मील दूर उत्तरी अटलांटिक महासागर के 4700 मीटर गहरे तल में मिला। लेकिन यह वही जहाज है इस बात की पुष्टि एसएस गैयरसोप्पा ने पिछले हफ्ते ही की है।

इस पूरे काम को अंजाम देने और खजाना बाहर निकालने में एक-दो साल तक लग सकते हैं।

एक जहाज में 1155 करोड रूपए का सोना चांदी था तो आप सोच सकते है कि अंग्रेज राबर्ट क्लाईव तो 700 जहाज सोने चांदी के भर के ब्रिटेन ले गया था अंग्रेजी गुलामी के दौर में, भारत सोने की चिडिया था और इसे पहले गोरे अंग्रेजो ने लूटा और आज कुछ काले अंग्रेज लूट रहे है देश में बडे बडे घपले करके

 

How India destroyed Traditional Knowledge Systems


The Orient Views

Another excellent article by Rajeev Malhotra.  All these Traditional Knowledge Systems (TKS) across our country is the result of the settled society of the 56 dhesams of our bharatha varsham. ( This point is missed by many hindu intellectuas who write about our culture and civilization.  If they could study these traditional dhesams and the native administrative systems, there could be more clarity in understanding our history)

The dhesams are formed based on the geographical nature of the region in which people choose to settle.  The traditional knowledge are nothing but the knowledge of how to sustainably live in these dhesams.   But the Urban Indians, who are uprooted from their traditional dhesams and resettled in Metros, treated these knowledge systems with utmost contempt (as backward & barbaric).

The academic institutions created in our country should have been designed to empower our local communities to document and improve their Traditional Knowledge. …

View original post 5,377 more words

THE TREE THAT IS A FOREST


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The Tree That is a Forest

 
The Great Banyan Tree

From afar, the Great Banyan Tree in the Indian Botanic Garden appears like a whole forest. It’s only once you step into its shade and see the connection of branches that you realize it is one tree.

The Great Banyan Tree
The Great Banyan Tree

With a canopy that spreads over 14,400 square meters, the Great Banyan Tree is the widest tree in the world. From this span, more than 2,800 aerial prop roots descend down into the earth, appearing like individual trees. It’s the main draw of the botanical garden, and although no one knows its exact origin, it has been showing up in guidebooks since the 1800s.

The Great Banyan Tree
Main trunk of the Great Banyan Tree in the 19th century

It’s taken it over 250 years to reach this staggering stretch, and not without a few natural disasters that almost did in the whole giant arboreal wonder. In the 19th century, two cyclones hit the tree, breaking it open and exposing its main trunk which led to a damaging fungal attack. By 1925, the main trunk, which once measured over 50 feet wide, had to be removed. Yet as the sign at the tree states: “interestingly enough, the tree now lives in perfect vigor without its main trunk.”
The clonal colony continues to flourish to this day, spreading further and wider into the land around it, spawning a visual forest that is all its own.

The Great Banyan Tree

 
 
 
 

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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A TREE THAT IS A FOREST


 

The Tree That is a Forest

The Great Banyan Tree

From afar, the Great Banyan Tree in the Indian Botanic Garden appears like a whole forest. It’s only once you step into its shade and see the connection of branches that you realize it is one tree.

The Great Banyan Tree
The Great Banyan Tree

With a canopy that spreads over 14,400 square meters, the Great Banyan Tree is the widest tree in the world. From this span, more than 2,800 aerial prop roots descend down into the earth, appearing like individual trees. It’s the main draw of the botanical garden, and although no one knows its exact origin, it has been showing up in guidebooks since the 1800s.

The Great Banyan Tree
Main trunk of the Great Banyan Tree in the 19th century

It’s taken it over 250 years to reach this staggering stretch, and not without a few natural disasters that almost did in the whole giant arboreal wonder. In the 19th century, two cyclones hit the tree, breaking it open and exposing its main trunk which led to a damaging fungal attack. By 1925, the main trunk, which once measured over 50 feet wide, had to be removed. Yet as the sign at the tree states: “interestingly enough, the tree now lives in perfect vigor without its main trunk.”

The clonal colony continues to flourish to this day, spreading further and wider into the land around it, spawning a visual forest that is all its own.

The Great Banyan Tree

 

Indian economy is in a mess, tasks for the next Government


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As Vaidyanathan notes: Corporate sector which is less than 15% of our National Income gobbles up nearly half of the bank credit…credit needs of unorganized or non-corporate sector are not met by the organized banking sector but by private money lenders etc. The cost of borrowing from private money lenders may be around 70 percent per annum. Small entrepreneurs get credit from money lenders using gold as collateral. FII and FDI account for only 6 to 8 per cent of our investment needs. So,  Vaidyanathan concludes that there is a need for a separate body to develop Non-banking Finance Secor (NBFS). http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/08/how-soniag-upa-killed-indian-economy.html

Gurumurthy notes: Current Account Deficit (CAD) has increased from $2.7 billion in 2004-5 to $89 billion in 2012-13. The primary reason is capital goods imports which increased from $25.5 billion in 2004-5 to $91.5 billion in 2012-13. Index of Industrial Production (IIP) has fallen by 56 % during the same period. Current Account Deficits necessitated huge external borrowing which increased from $108 billion in 2004-5 to $396 billion in 2012-13. CADs also meant that India lost its wealth to other nations by providing increased import orders from countries like China.

Added to these macro-fiscal data, there has been a problem of corruption of unprecedented magnitude topped by the stashing away of corrupted loot through hawala channels and participatory notes mechanisms in tax havens, thus making the wealth not available to the country’s financial system, while benefiting the coffers of tax haven nations.

The level of fiscal and financial management has led to the fall in share market indices and Rupee-Dollar exchange rates have reached abysmal and intolerable levels.

In any democratic system, such mismanagement of the economy should have resulted in the dismissal of the Finance Minister and consequent resignation of the Prime Minister. But, strange is the state in India ruled by a person who is not a constitutionally accountable authority – Sonia Gandhi who heads the National Advisory Council and calls the decisions to profligate spending to the tune of Rs. 6 lakh crores per year on schemes such as MNREGA (Rs. 4 lakh crores) or Food Security (Rs. 2 lakh crores). Such schemes are politically justified as effective means of combating poverty. Little attention is paid while authorizing such state-sponsored doll outs, to the increase in productive capacity by increasing the skill matrix of workers or increasing the wealth of the nation. For example, the MNREGA guaranteed employment scheme could have been linked to a project like Interlinking of the nation’s rivers which could potentially add an additional 9 crores of wet land with assured irrigation with assured additions to the nation’s granary of agricultural production and agricultural employment.
Thus, economics are turned upside down in Indian polity. Even the opposition parties have failed in their responsibility to safeguard the nation’s financial resources by dancing to the SoniaG economic tunes by endorsing false promises of the MNREGA or Food Security type schemes.

Economics is looked upon as an esoteric discipline which requires smart operators like P. Chidambaram to ‘manage’ the economy. This  results in a serious political failure of the politicians failing to realize what causes the financial mess that the nation finds itself in with the devaluation of the Rupee and with the loss of notional wealth reflected in stock market indices.

As Vaidyanathan notes, the saving grace of the economy is that about 60% of the economy operates through unorganized or non-corporate sectors. The serious structural fault-lines of not establishing reasonable credit-lines to these unorganized or non-corporate sectors is a major failure of the state which has to be rectified by the next Government, which hopefully should be a clear alternative to Sonianomics and SoniaG-led UPA riddled with corruption and stashing away of illicit wealth into tax havens.

The policy imperatives for the next Government after the Lok Sabha polls are thus clear and unambiguous:

1.       Promote projects such as the Interlinking of rivers on a priority basis. Hon’ble SC has not only endorsed the project but also has suggested a monitoring authority to oversee the effective implementation of the project.

2.       Ban Participatory Notes.

3.       To enable restitution of illicit wealth stashed in tax havens, an ordinance should be promulgated to nationalize such wealth, a measure similar to the nationalization of private banks done by Indira Gandhi. The measure is to meet progressively and serve better, the needs of development of the economy in conformity with national policy and objectives enunciated in the Directive Principles of State Policy.

4.       Establish a Special Finance Commission to review the credit needs of unorganized or non-corporate sectors of the economy and to establish a monetary authority to oversee the working of the non-banking finance sector.

5.       Review the present system of opening up the nation’s mines to private sector and review the imperative of a Mines and Minerals Development Regulatory Authority on the lines of Telecom Regulatory Authority.

6.       Disband the Planning Commission by establishing a Special Economic Development Commission to recommend steps for sustainable increase in the wealth of the nation by productive projects, by disbanding unproductive dole outs of the MNREGA or Food Security type schemes.

Courtesy  Sri  S. Kalyanaraman

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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VALUE OF INDIAN RUPEE


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Dear friends

I got the following information from Yahoo opening page yesterday. This gives the value of Indian rupee against currencies of some other countries. Indirectly currency of some other countries also comes to our information from it (For those who are not so familiar)

Sincerely
Dated 21-8-2013

Against Japanese Yen
1 JPY = 0.66 rupees

2. Against Zimbabwe Dollar
1 ZWD = 2.02 rupees

3. Against Thailand Baht
1 Thai baht = 2.02 rupees

4. Against Hong Kong Dollar
1 HKD = 8.23 rupees

5. Against Chinese Yuan
1 CNY = 10.42 rupees

6. Against Malaysian Ringgit
1 MYR = 19.35 rupees

7. Against Singapore Dollar
1 SGD = 49.94 rupees

8. Against New Zealand Dollar
1 NZD = 50.98 rupees

9. Against Australian Dollar
1 AUD = 57.85 rupees

10 Against Canadian Dollar
1 CAD = 61.57 rupees

11. Against US Dollar
1 USD = 63.85 rupees

12 Against Swiss franc
1 CHF = 69.18 rupees

13. Against Euro
1 EUR = 85.24 rupees

14. Against British Pound Sterling
1 GBP = 99.92 rupees

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Indian economy is in a mess, tasks for the next Government


 

As Vaidyanathan notes: Corporate sector which is less than 15% of our National Income gobbles up nearly half of the bank credit…credit needs of unorganized or non-corporate sector are not met by the organized banking sector but by private money lenders etc. The cost of borrowing from private money lenders may be around 70 percent per annum. Small entrepreneurs get credit from money lenders using gold as collateral. FII and FDI account for only 6 to 8 per cent of our investment needs. So,  Vaidyanathan concludes that there is a need for a separate body to develop Non-banking Finance Secor (NBFS). http://bharatkalyan97.blogspot.in/2013/08/how-soniag-upa-killed-indian-economy.html
 
Gurumurthy notes: Current Account Deficit (CAD) has increased from $2.7 billion in 2004-5 to $89 billion in 2012-13. The primary reason is capital goods imports which increased from $25.5 billion in 2004-5 to $91.5 billion in 2012-13. Index of Industrial Production (IIP) has fallen by 56 % during the same period. Current Account Deficits necessitated huge external borrowing which increased from $108 billion in 2004-5 to $396 billion in 2012-13. CADs also meant that India lost its wealth to other nations by providing increased import orders from countries like China.
 
Added to these macro-fiscal data, there has been a problem of corruption of unprecedented magnitude topped by the stashing away of corrupted loot through hawala channels and participatory notes mechanisms in tax havens, thus making the wealth not available to the country’s financial system, while benefiting the coffers of tax haven nations.
 
The level of fiscal and financial management has led to the fall in share market indices and Rupee-Dollar exchange rates have reached abysmal and intolerable levels.
 
In any democratic system, such mismanagement of the economy should have resulted in the dismissal of the Finance Minister and consequent resignation of the Prime Minister. But, strange is the state in India ruled by a person who is not a constitutionally accountable authority – Sonia Gandhi who heads the National Advisory Council and calls the decisions to profligate spending to the tune of Rs. 6 lakh crores per year on schemes such as MNREGA (Rs. 4 lakh crores) or Food Security (Rs. 2 lakh crores). Such schemes are politically justified as effective means of combating poverty. Little attention is paid while authorizing such state-sponsored doll outs, to the increase in productive capacity by increasing the skill matrix of workers or increasing the wealth of the nation. For example, the MNREGA guaranteed employment scheme could have been linked to a project like Interlinking of the nation’s rivers which could potentially add an additional 9 crores of wet land with assured irrigation with assured additions to the nation’s granary of agricultural production and agricultural employment.
Thus, economics are turned upside down in Indian polity. Even the opposition parties have failed in their responsibility to safeguard the nation’s financial resources by dancing to the SoniaG economic tunes by endorsing false promises of the MNREGA or Food Security type schemes.
 
Economics is looked upon as an esoteric discipline which requires smart operators like P. Chidambaram to ‘manage’ the economy. This  results in a serious political failure of the politicians failing to realize what causes the financial mess that the nation finds itself in with the devaluation of the Rupee and with the loss of notional wealth reflected in stock market indices.
 
As Vaidyanathan notes, the saving grace of the economy is that about 60% of the economy operates through unorganized or non-corporate sectors. The serious structural fault-lines of not establishing reasonable credit-lines to these unorganized or non-corporate sectors is a major failure of the state which has to be rectified by the next Government, which hopefully should be a clear alternative to Sonianomics and SoniaG-led UPA riddled with corruption and stashing away of illicit wealth into tax havens.
 
The policy imperatives for the next Government after the Lok Sabha polls are thus clear and unambiguous:
 
1.       Promote projects such as the Interlinking of rivers on a priority basis. Hon’ble SC has not only endorsed the project but also has suggested a monitoring authority to oversee the effective implementation of the project.
 
2.       Ban Participatory Notes.
 
3.       To enable restitution of illicit wealth stashed in tax havens, an ordinance should be promulgated to nationalize such wealth, a measure similar to the nationalization of private banks done by Indira Gandhi. The measure is to meet progressively and serve better, the needs of development of the economy in conformity with national policy and objectives enunciated in the Directive Principles of State Policy.
 
4.       Establish a Special Finance Commission to review the credit needs of unorganized or non-corporate sectors of the economy and to establish a monetary authority to oversee the working of the non-banking finance sector.
 
5.       Review the present system of opening up the nation’s mines to private sector and review the imperative of a Mines and Minerals Development Regulatory Authority on the lines of Telecom Regulatory Authority.
 
6.       Disband the Planning Commission by establishing a Special Economic Development Commission to recommend steps for sustainable increase in the wealth of the nation by productive projects, by disbanding unproductive dole outs of the MNREGA or Food Security type schemes.
 
 courtesy S. Kalyanaraman