All about mouth ulcer


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Mouth ulcers can be a pain. One mouth ulcer can make eating an ordeal and speaking tough. And in some of us, they come in groups, all over the mouth and lips. There are times you wish you could just pluck them off and throw them away. It’s also when you have ulcers in the mouth that you want to eat everything in visible range and say so many things to people around you, neither of which is easy. At painful times like this, we wish we could understand the cause behind our ulcers, wish we could get immediate relief and wish they would not recur.
Mouth ulcers, or canker sores, also called aphthous ulcers are small sores in the mouth, usually on the tongue, the inside of lips and the inner lining of cheeks. Sores outside the mouth, on and around the lips are called cold sores and are caused by the Herpes virus. Apthouos ulcers, on the other hand, could occur for numerous reasons.
 
What causes mouth ulcers?
There is no single reason to explain the open sores inside your mouth. We take a look at the various things that can cause aphthous ulcers.
The most common cause of ulcers is trauma. Accidentally biting your tongue, wounds caused by sharp object (such as pens and other objects that some of us like to chew) and burning your tongue with excessively hot food or drinks all lead to sores inside the mouth. Sharp molar teeth with jagged edges, sometimes left that way after dental procedures also rub against the lateral side of the tongue and cause wounds there. A second of injury often leaves one with painful ulcers lasting up to a week or more.
Mouth ulcers can also be caused by dietary habits and deficiency of certain vitamins, most commonly vitamin B12 and Vitamin C. Deficiency of minerals such as zinc could also cause mouth ulcers. People who eat hot, spicy food and do not drink adequate water are also seen to develop frequent canker sores.
Some of us get recurrent mouth ulcers for no particular reason. While canker sores are not transmitted through food or saliva, it has been noticed that the problem can be a hereditary one, meaning if one our parents develop frequent mouth ulcers, chances are high that we might do the same. People with conditions affecting the immune system, such as HIV, also develop frequent aphthous ulcers.
Smoking cessation is also marked by frequent ulcers which may recur weeks or months after quitting. For someone who has just given up on smoking, this can be a rather annoying experience.
Stress seems to cause mouth ulcers, too. And though many refute or debate this, some amount of research suggests that one often tends to develop sores in the mouth at times of high stress when one is feeling run down. Some women also tend to develop ulcers before their menstrual periods, suggesting that the condition could have hormonal causes. Certain compounds such as Sodium Lauryl Sulfate that are present in toothpaste also seem to cause mouth ulcers.
As such, it is often hard to point to an exact cause of a single mouth ulcer.
 
Types of mouth ulcers
Yes, there are varieties to those painful sores, too. Minor aphthous ulcers are the most common ones that occur on the tongue, cheeks, gums or inner lips and usually go away in around a week’s time without leaving behind any scars. Major aphthous ulcers are larger ulcers, usually around 10mm, and take a longer time to heal. They can last for months altogether and can leave behind scars. Herpetiform ulcers are a conglomeration of multiple ulcers at a single spot on the tongue and usually heal in around a month.
 
Managing the sting
Irrespective of what their size it, all aphthous ulcers have one thing in common. They hurt. While we tolerate them the rest of the time, they are a nag while eating. The pain one has to withstand can entirely kill the desire to eat. Brushing becomes another difficult task. The ulcers, of course, will take their own sweet time to heal but there are certain things we can do to minimize the pain.
§ Over the counter medication is easy to find and mostly includes pastes, gels and liquids that coat the ulcers and numb the pain. Keeping ice in the mouth for sometime before eating can also numb the ulcer and minimize the sting. Non-alcoholic and anti-bacterial mouthwash help maintain oral hygiene and prevent secondary infection.
§ Avoid eating food that is spicy, hot, sour or excessively salty. They sting all the more, even if you have applied anesthetics.
Use a toothpaste that does not contain SLS (Sodium Laurel Sulfate). SLS is a foaming agent that is found in most toothpastes. However, there are a few herbal toothpaste brands in India that are SLS-free or have a lesser percentage of the chemical. Many tooth powders, too are SLS-free. Run through the list of
§ ingredients before picking up a brand.
§ Avoid eating food that can be painful on open wounds. Potato chips, nuts, wafers etc. are harder on your ulcers. Save them for days when your mouth is healthy and ulcer-free.
§ If your ulcers are being caused by regualr injuries by sharp teeth edges, dentures or braces, visit and dentist and try to resolve the problem.
§ Prevention, needless to say, is better than cure. If you are able to point to a particular reason for your ulcers, try avoid it to the maximum. Among people who have recurring ulcers, regular intake of vitamin supplements, such as vitamin B12 tablets, can reduce occurrence of mouth ulcers.
§
Very importantly, reduce stress. Feeling low and run down and troubling our brains a little too much will only result in painful tongues. Many of us by now are used to getting mouth ulcers frequently and we should strive to do whatever little we can do to reduce their frequency.
Note: This is just for the information of the readers, for more details and guidance get it touch with a physician.
Best Regards
Prakash Nair


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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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Innovations from the ’50s, We still use Today


 
 
 
 
Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

1.Credit cards (1950). Diner’s Club introduced the first credit card in 1950. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

2.Diet Soda (1952). The first diet soda, No-Cal, was introduced by the Kirsch Bottling in 1952. It’s inventors Hyman and Morris Kirsch created the sugar-free soda for hospitalized diabetic patients at the Jewish Sanitarium for Chronic Disease (now known as Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center). In 1958, Royal Crown Cola introduced the second sugar-free soda, Diet Rite. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

3.Roll-on deodorant (1952). Prior to the invention of Ban Roll-On, the most common deodorant was Everdry, a aluminum chloride solution that was applied with cotton swabs. Besides being messy and taking forever to dry, Everdry also had the nice side effect of eating through clothes. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

4.TV dinners (1953). Swanson changed our world when they introduced the first TV dinner back in 1953. They were such a huge success that they ended up selling more than 10 million during the first year of production. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

5.Color television (1953). Color TV was the HD TV of its time; introduced in the U.S. in 1953, it took a while to catch on (more than a decade) due high prices and lack of color broadcasts. The first national color cast was the 1954 Tournament of Roses Parade. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

6.Microwave oven (1954). The Raytheon Corporation produced the first microwaves for commercial use. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

7.Automatic doors (1954). Inventors Dee Horton and Lew Hewitt created the sliding automatic door after witnessing the difficultly people had with opening swing doors in the wind. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

8.Velcro (1955). Without Velcro I would have never been able to rock some seriously badass sneakers ‘ actually I might not have worn shoes for the first six years of my life. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

9.3-Point seat belts. Volvo introduced the first three-point belt in 1959, prior and made them a standard item in the Volvo 122, that same year. 

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10.Ultrasound (1956). Ultrasounds were first used for clinical purposes in 1956 in Glasgow. But, it wouldn’t become common until the 1970s, when hospitals in Britain and the U.S. adopted it for use. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

11.Bubble Wrap (1957). Could you imagine living in a world without the pleasure of popping bubble wrap! I couldn’t live in that world. It was actually created by accident; it’s inventors, Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes, were attempting to create a 3-dimensional plastic wallpaper, not packing material. 

Fun & Info @ Keralites.net

12.Birth control pill (1957). Although the pill is associated with the sexual revolution of the 1960s, it was actually created in the ’50s. The FDA approved the pill in 1957, but only for cases of severe menstrual disorders and not as a contraceptive. Large number of women all of sudden developed severe menstrual disorders. It wouldn’t be until 1960, that the pill would be approved for contraceptive use.

 

All about mouth ulcer


 

 

 
Mouth ulcers can be a pain. One mouth ulcer can make eating an ordeal and speaking tough. And in some of us, they come in groups, all over the mouth and lips. There are times you wish you could just pluck them off and throw them away. It’s also when you have ulcers in the mouth that you want to eat everything in visible range and say so many things to people around you, neither of which is easy. At painful times like this, we wish we could understand the cause behind our ulcers, wish we could get immediate relief and wish they would not recur.
Mouth ulcers, or canker sores, also called aphthous ulcers are small sores in the mouth, usually on the tongue, the inside of lips and the inner lining of cheeks. Sores outside the mouth, on and around the lips are called cold sores and are caused by the Herpes virus. Apthouos ulcers, on the other hand, could occur for numerous reasons.
 
What causes mouth ulcers?
There is no single reason to explain the open sores inside your mouth. We take a look at the various things that can cause aphthous ulcers.
The most common cause of ulcers is trauma. Accidentally biting your tongue, wounds caused by sharp object (such as pens and other objects that some of us like to chew) and burning your tongue with excessively hot food or drinks all lead to sores inside the mouth. Sharp molar teeth with jagged edges, sometimes left that way after dental procedures also rub against the lateral side of the tongue and cause wounds there. A second of injury often leaves one with painful ulcers lasting up to a week or more.
Mouth ulcers can also be caused by dietary habits and deficiency of certain vitamins, most commonly vitamin B12 and Vitamin C. Deficiency of minerals such as zinc could also cause mouth ulcers. People who eat hot, spicy food and do not drink adequate water are also seen to develop frequent canker sores.
Some of us get recurrent mouth ulcers for no particular reason. While canker sores are not transmitted through food or saliva, it has been noticed that the problem can be a hereditary one, meaning if one our parents develop frequent mouth ulcers, chances are high that we might do the same. People with conditions affecting the immune system, such as HIV, also develop frequent aphthous ulcers.
Smoking cessation is also marked by frequent ulcers which may recur weeks or months after quitting. For someone who has just given up on smoking, this can be a rather annoying experience.
Stress seems to cause mouth ulcers, too. And though many refute or debate this, some amount of research suggests that one often tends to develop sores in the mouth at times of high stress when one is feeling run down. Some women also tend to develop ulcers before their menstrual periods, suggesting that the condition could have hormonal causes. Certain compounds such as Sodium Lauryl Sulfate that are present in toothpaste also seem to cause mouth ulcers.
As such, it is often hard to point to an exact cause of a single mouth ulcer.
 
Types of mouth ulcers
Yes, there are varieties to those painful sores, too. Minor aphthous ulcers are the most common ones that occur on the tongue, cheeks, gums or inner lips and usually go away in around a week’s time without leaving behind any scars. Major aphthous ulcers are larger ulcers, usually around 10mm, and take a longer time to heal. They can last for months altogether and can leave behind scars. Herpetiform ulcers are a conglomeration of multiple ulcers at a single spot on the tongue and usually heal in around a month.
 
Managing the sting
Irrespective of what their size it, all aphthous ulcers have one thing in common. They hurt. While we tolerate them the rest of the time, they are a nag while eating. The pain one has to withstand can entirely kill the desire to eat. Brushing becomes another difficult task. The ulcers, of course, will take their own sweet time to heal but there are certain things we can do to minimize the pain.
§ Over the counter medication is easy to find and mostly includes pastes, gels and liquids that coat the ulcers and numb the pain. Keeping ice in the mouth for sometime before eating can also numb the ulcer and minimize the sting. Non-alcoholic and anti-bacterial mouthwash help maintain oral hygiene and prevent secondary infection.
§ Avoid eating food that is spicy, hot, sour or excessively salty. They sting all the more, even if you have applied anesthetics.
Use a toothpaste that does not contain SLS (Sodium Laurel Sulfate). SLS is a foaming agent that is found in most toothpastes. However, there are a few herbal toothpaste brands in India that are SLS-free or have a lesser percentage of the chemical. Many tooth powders, too are SLS-free. Run through the list of
§ ingredients before picking up a brand.
§ Avoid eating food that can be painful on open wounds. Potato chips, nuts, wafers etc. are harder on your ulcers. Save them for days when your mouth is healthy and ulcer-free.
§ If your ulcers are being caused by regualr injuries by sharp teeth edges, dentures or braces, visit and dentist and try to resolve the problem.
§ Prevention, needless to say, is better than cure. If you are able to point to a particular reason for your ulcers, try avoid it to the maximum. Among people who have recurring ulcers, regular intake of vitamin supplements, such as vitamin B12 tablets, can reduce occurrence of mouth ulcers.
§
Very importantly, reduce stress. Feeling low and run down and troubling our brains a little too much will only result in painful tongues. Many of us by now are used to getting mouth ulcers frequently and we should strive to do whatever little we can do to reduce their frequency.
Note: This is just for the information of the readers, for more details and guidance get it touch with a physician.
Best Regards
Prakash Nair

Who is a Brahmin?


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FYI.
Received this from a reliable source.
I always get in trouble with my so called Brahmin friends. In fact, one time
one asked me “Are you not Brahmin?” So, I asked him tell me who is “Brahmin”.
No one in that gathering or any other has ever defined “Brahmin” to me. When I tell
them that we all are “Shudras” they all get in arms.
Any way, this article may be of interest to you.
By the way, I know the author for last 20+ years.
I like to get your feedback.
Sincerely,
Raam
Hari OM!
===========================================================================
Who is a Brahmin?
by
S. Mitra

It is commonly assumed in India and elsewhere in the world that a person who introduces himself as a Brahmin is also accepted as the son of a Brahmin. It is not known how and when the Varna system or the allocation of different statuses began in the Indian society and later on when the various statuses began to be acquired simply by inheritance. It is a well-known fact that once a social custom is somehow accepted, it becomes normative. That is to say, it is taken for granted and over time it becomes a tradition. If it’s validity or usefulness is questioned at a later time it usually falls in deaf ears until it becomes a public outcry.

Indeed it is interesting to note that the question arose even in the era of Mahabharata when the Brahmins were at the top of the social hierarchy. Although that exalted status was supposed to beacheived, it was true that then, as it is now, the statuses were mostly inherited and not acheived. It is no wonder that even then the social thinkers felt the need to settle the issue and we find the declaration in the shastras –


All human beings are born as shudras. Only through initiation by a qualified teacher one becomes a dwija or twice born. In the next stage, through extensive study of the scriptures one becomes a Vipra. Afterwards, one has to traverse, as the scriptures declare, the razor thin road to realize Brahman in order to become a brahmin.


Lord Buddha himself also had to talk about this issue. He expressed himself so elegantly when he said, ‘him I shall regard as a brahmin who is not running after fulfilling any desire past or present, does not harbor any desire in his mind, does neither ask nor accept anyfavor from anyone.’


How does one then recognize a brahmin ? A true brahmin will certainly not blow his own horn. He needs no recognition from others unlike those of modern times who will deliberately bear signs or symbols at least on occasions when they feel the need to demonstrate their identity. But a true brahmin, like a musk-deer, cannot hide himself.


In Bhagavdgita, The Lord has said, ‘ I have created the four varnas by the differences ofguna and karma ( qualities and actions ) ‘ (4:13).. Later, in (18:42), He added a few pointers to recognise a brahmin. Those are tranquility, self-restraint, austerity, purity, forbearence, uprightness, knowledge and realisation which, as if born out of their nature, are reflected in their karmas.


In this context, the dialogue between Yudhisthhira and his ancestor Nahusha who, on that occasion, had to become a serpent due to a curse he received for his past mis-deed, is worth noting. At that time, the Pandavas were forest dwellers (Mahabharata, Vanaparva, 177:15-16). One of the many questions Yudhisthhira had to answer was, ‘Oh king, who should we call a brahmin’ ? Yudhisthhira’s reply was unambiguous, ‘when truthfulness, charity,forbearence, moral character, nonviolence etc. are reflected in a person, I call him abrahmin’. Note that the first and foremost among the traits mentioned by Yudhisthhira was truthfulness. In fact, truthfulness stands supreme among all the other traits. Not only that, but all the others also follow it. We find an excellent illustration of this principle in the life of Satyakamaas narrated in Chhandogya Upanishad (4:4). When Satyakama, desirous of acquiring spiritual knowledge, approached a teacher and requested to accept him as a disciple, the teacher wanted to know his lineage. Satyakam’s reply was, ‘before coming to you I asked my mother Jabala the same question and she said, ‘I got you in my youth when I was  busy with numerous duties in serving many. The question of knowing your ancestry did not cross my mind. Therefore, if necessary, introduce yourself as Satyakama, son of Jabala”. The teacher instantly declared, “no nonbrahmincan say what you have said. Prepare yourself for the ritual of discipleship”.


Remaining committed to truth the whole life is a task that is next to impossible. As such,Yudhisthhira himself, who was known as Dharmaputra, had to succumb to the pressure to conceal the truth when he was called upon to take the most crucial test of his life. Oh, how a person of his stature must have suffered from the pain caused by that single dark spot in his otherwise unblemished and dazzling character.


This incident of course took place long after Yudhisthhira’s encouter with his serpent ancestorNahusha. Then, pleased with Yudhisthhira’s answer Nahusha argued, ‘the qualities you mentioned certainly can be found even in a person who has the label of a shudra.’ Yudhisthhira’s response was swift and firm. He said, ‘if in a person those traits are not present he should be regarded as ashudra in spite of his social label of a brahmin and vice versa.’


While the similatities between the characterizations of a brahmin put forward by Yudhisthhira and Lord Krishna are noteworthy, the ascent to the spiritual peak is yet to be completed. InShantiparva of Mahabharata we find the description of that state (245:12), when the recognition ofbrahminhood is extended by the gods. That is a state of total surrender at which one does not care about how to cover the body, what to put in the mouth or where to rest.


Sri Ramakrishna once told one of his devotees who was not only a brahmin in terms of his inherited social status but he was also spiritually quite well advanced. Upon learning that he is a medical practitioner, Ramakrishna said that is not a profession for a brahmin to practice. Then, after finding out that the doctor has to support a large number of people, he recanted and later told him, ‘don’t give up the practice but do not earn more than you need to live a frugal life’. The doctor took his words and followed his advice until one day when a verse fromKrishnayajurvedasamhita caught his attention. It said among other things that a brahmin must not practice medicine. He thought, ‘Sri Ramakrishna must have found me unfit for spiritual advancement and permitted to hold on to my profession’. Thereafter, he did not hesitate for a moment and gave up practicing medicine to earn his livelihood.


Nowadays, the visible differences among the castes are at a very low point, particularly in large urban areas. There, of necessity, one can not exercise any control over who one comes in close contact with in a public place. Also, there are very few vocations that are caste selective today. Yet, tradition does not easily lets loose its grip and many of the so called brahmins suffer in their hearts from the suppression of the indignity of unavoidable contacts with those they can not accept as their equals. Isn’t our pride as rational thinkers contradictory to such a pattern of psychological state of mind ?


Yet, this is not a lesson to be learned from our glorious past. There were not many in those days who did not bow down before Sri Rama or Sri Krishna and neither of them were brahmins. Who again were disrespectful to Narada or Vyasa, the author of Mahabharata ? According to Bhagavata,Narada was the son of a maidservant like Satyakama and Vyasa’s mother was a fisherman’s adopted daughter and his father was a  sage of unknown caste.

The following may not be out of place in this context which ironically is a contradiction in terms. The brahmin priests today, as in the past,  depend for their livelihood mostly on nonbrahminyajmans. Not only do they gladly accept but they also expect appropriate offering when they perform a religious ritual but will not, at least in some parts of West Bengal, eat rice cooked by them. It is interesting to note that the need to perform designated rituals at different times of the year have been shrewdly instilled by the so called priests such that the yajmans believing that these will be beneficial, if not in this life but surely in the next, succcumb to that temptation. This has become a tradition which is so ingrained that the yajmans believe that in this endeavor their task is just to provide the materials called for the occasion and everything else will be taken care of by the priests. The priests appear to demonstrate the gravity of  these rituals by chanting mantras written in Sanskrit although very few of them, are aware of the meanings and relevance of those mantras for the occasion. In most societies, codes of normative behavior are rarely questioned and  that is why here also, both parties, priests as well as yajmans, believe that, understood or not, mantras chanted in any other order or by a nonbrahmin or in any other language will not serve the intended purpose.

The priests are of course acknowledged as brahmins by the society by virtue of only their lineage and not by their qualities. Although the scriptures clearly defines brahminhood which unfortunately have remained out of bounds to the nonbrahmins for so long, that now although they are accessible to anyone, very few of the so-called brahmins devote their time to understand their proper role in the society. The yajmans, however, are quite content by giving something like the power of attorney to the priests to take care of their need in this and the other world. It is interesting to note that in modern times, internal migration mostly from rural to urban areas or between urban areas, makes it possible for anyone to assume the identity of another caste under the veil of anonymity since, as yet, requiring a birth certificate and assigning a number soon after birth has not been properly instituted.


Be that as it may, the status of brahminhood that is usually inherited and not achieved, seems to be associated with a superiority complex.  This phenomenon becomes more and more noticable in cosmopolitan cities outside India where prestige at this point in time is mostly associated with occupation and wealth and not with lineage. The mental deprivation felt by these so calledbrahmins for lack of recognition of the superiority of their caste thus manifests in patterns of irrational behavior like the formation of an exclusive  group and naming it a brahmin society. While the formation of groups on the basis of language, occupation, religion and the like may make some sense, forming a group with that label appears not only to be a desperate attempt on the part of its members to derive a false sense of superiority where there is none, but it also is divisive and is harmful for the Hindus who should have a united front in their adopted country. I have seen a renowned professor in India filling his earthen water vessel from the tap himself  and not asking his personal office bearer to get it for fear of contamination. I have heard a member of the Indian public service commission lamenting  over the government allowing a nonbrahmin to chant from a scripture at the radio station. I have known parents disowning their children for choosing their mates from another caste. Even in this country, when parental influence over their children is declining I have seen an extreme example of a father’s threatening to commit suicide if the daughter chooses to marry without his blessings. Naturally, in these days of rapid social changes, it is no wonder that when the children marry within their so-called own caste, the parents will proudly announce the event with great fanfare.


The universality of social stratification is a reality at all times and in all places although, in some instances at least, extreme separation among groups characterized by absence of interaction is hard to accept. As there is no justification to let differences in skin color, physical characteristics and the like to be the determinants of social inequality, in the same way, the ancestry should not be used to define a person’s social status. But this is the ideal state that never was.


In Uttarakanda of Ramayana, there is the story of the death of a child of a brahmin. While mourning, the family was blaming Rama’s inability to maintain Dharma in the kingdom as the cause of  the untimely death. The reason for this dereliction of duty was investigated and found to be the performance of austerity or tapasya by Shambuka, a shudra. How can a shudra who has no right to practice tapas dare to do such a thing in Ramarajya ?  So Rama  marched into the forest, found Shambuka and delivered the due punishment by beheading him. It is hard to believe that such an example is to be found in the scripture for the citizenry to understand their rights and obligations. Some modern critics of Ramayana have noted that the last or the Uttarakanda of Ramayana was not written by Valmiki because in the concluding section of the preceding or theYuddhakanda, he has already described the Phalasruti or the result that one can expect by listening to or reading Ramayana. Since the authority of a scripture is rarely challenged  the purpose of such secret and quiet intrusion by anonymous authors can easily be understood.


It took a lot of courage to stand up and revolt against such long established and deep rooted social norms and traditions as we find much later in Mahabharata where, only a giant like Karna made his point loud and clear. Disgusted by the ridicule and insult showered on him by the Kshatriyas and the teacher Dronacharya, he said at the top of his voice, “ I had no control over my ancestry but I have the power to become what I want to be “. But singlehanded he was no match against the prevailing abusive human rights.


But that was then. Karna had to suffer from the indignities and humiliations but unbeknownst to him, he certainly laid the seed to germinate, albeit slowly. Not long ago, Sankaracharya, that great saint and venerable scholar, had to be taught that the soul has no caste by the Lord himself who in the disguise of a lower caste, was blocking the way for Sankaracharya to pass through. It is regrettable that the practice of untouchability, denial of rights to enter temples etc. have yet to become things of the past. When, oh when, shall we see the day when we can loudly declare that we are all Harijans.

END.

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Ranjani Geethalaya(Regd.) (Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860. Regn No S/28043 of 1995) A society for promotion of traditional values through,  Music, Dance, Art , Culture, Education and Social service. REGD OFFICE A-73 Inderpuri, New Delhi-110012, INDIA Email: ranjanigeethalaya@gmail.com  web: http://ranjanigeethalaya.webs.com (M)9868369793 all donations/contributions may be sent to Ranjani Geethalaya ( Regd) A/c no 3063000100374737, Punjab National Bank, ER 14, Inder Puri, New Delhi-110012, MICR CODE 110024135  IFSC CODE PUNB00306300

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